The Autobiography of John Galt, Volume 1

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Cochrane and M'Crone, 1833 - Canada - 412 pages
 

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Page 158 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Page 120 - When the performance was over, Mr. Hill came down with Lord Byron to the gate of the upper town, where his Lordship, as we were taking leave, thanked him with more elocution than was precisely requisite.
Page 334 - Everybody who has ever been at Dover knows that it is one of the vilest blue-devil haunts on the face of the earth, except Little York in Upper Canada, when he has been there one day.
Page 20 - Shaws water, — for exactly the same purpose as the canal has been since executed. ... In the Firth, opposite to Greenock, there is a large sand-bank often dry at low water. When it was proposed to enlarge the harbour it occurred to me that this bank might be converted into land, and I have still a very cheap and feasible plan for gradually doing it, but unfortunately the bank belonged to the Crown, and was too sacred to be improved.
Page 121 - They expected — at least he did — a salute from the batteries, and sent ashore notice to Sir Alexander Ball, the governor, of his arrival ; but the guns were sulky, and evinced no respect of persons ; so that late in the afternoon, about the heel of the evening, the two magnates were obliged to come on shore, and slip into the city unnoticed and unknown.
Page 346 - ... great vicissitudes, it called forth exertion, and though few could suffer more intensely, still fewer could look at the worst of fortune more undismayed, when endeavour might avert the threatening. " To myself the event was, perhaps, more influential than most readers may imagine. From my very childhood it had been my greatest delight to please this affectionate parent, and in consequence her loss weakened, if I may say, the motive that had previously impelled my energies. The world, to me, was...
Page 305 - that the money to be paid by the Canada Company was not considered by His Majesty's Government to be applicable to the relief of the sufferers by the late war with the United States.
Page 242 - ... especially as the Colony could utilize the proceeds from the sale of Crown Lands to create a fund for that purpose. In line with his visionary nature, was the fact that dull commercial pursuits were wholly unattractive to him, and, to quote his own words, "I never in my whole life have been able to lend my heart to any business "whatever in which the imagination had not a share.
Page 53 - Campbell began his poetical career by an Ossianic poem, which was published by his schoolfellows when he was only thirteen. At fifteen he wrote a poem on the Queen of France, which ~was published in the Glasgow Courier. At eighteen, he printed his Elegy called ' Love and Madness ; ' and at twenty-one, before the finishing of his twenty-second year,

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