The Autobiography of Medgar Evers: A Hero's Life and Legacy Revealed Through His Writings, Letters, and Speeches

Front Cover
Basic Books, May 31, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
On the evening of June 12, 1963—the day President John F. Kennedy gave his most impassioned speech about the need for interracial tolerance —Medgar Evers, the NAACP’s first field secretary in Mississippi, was shot and killed by an assassin’s bullet in his driveway. The still-smoking gun—bearing the fingerprints of Byron De La Beckwith, a staunch white supremacist—was recovered moments later in some nearby bushes. Still, Beckwith remained free for over thirty years, until Evers’s widow finally forced the Mississippi courts to bring him to justice.The Autobiography of Medgar Evers tells the full story of one the greatest leaders of the civil rights movement, bringing his achievement to life for a new generation. Although Evers’s memory has remained a force in the civil rights movement, the legal battles surrounding his death have too often overshadowed the example and inspiration of his life.Myrlie Evers-Williams and Manning Marable have assembled the previously untouched cache of Medgar’s personal documents, writings, and speeches. These remarkable pieces range from Medgar’s monthly reports to the NAACP to his correspondence with luminaries of the time such as Robert Carter, General Counsel for the NAACP in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. Most important of all are the recollections of Myrlie Evers, combined with letters from her personal collection. These documents and memories form the backbone of The Autobiography of Medgar Evers— a cohesive narrative detailing the rise and tragic death of a civil rights hero.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

The autobiography of Medgar Evers: a hero's life and legacy revealed through his writings, letters, and speeches

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

June 2005 marks the 42nd anniversary of the assassination of Evers, the civil rights leader and first Mississippi field secretary of the NAACP. His autobiography has been put together for the first ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
17
V
21
VI
27
VII
33
VIII
34
IX
37
X
38
LII
185
LIII
188
LIV
190
LV
191
LVI
193
LVII
194
LVIII
195
LX
198

XI
39
XII
41
XIII
43
XIV
45
XV
47
XVI
53
XVII
54
XVIII
57
XIX
59
XX
67
XXI
69
XXII
72
XXIII
73
XXIV
78
XXV
79
XXVI
80
XXVIII
85
XXIX
91
XXX
92
XXXI
94
XXXII
97
XXXIII
99
XXXV
107
XXXVI
110
XXXVII
111
XXXVIII
122
XXXIX
125
XL
128
XLI
131
XLII
137
XLIII
140
XLIV
156
XLV
158
XLVI
160
XLVII
163
XLVIII
166
XLIX
170
L
174
LI
177
LXI
199
LXII
202
LXIII
213
LXIV
220
LXV
223
LXVII
225
LXVIII
228
LXIX
230
LXX
231
LXXI
234
LXXII
235
LXXIII
243
LXXV
245
LXXVI
249
LXXVII
255
LXXVIII
263
LXXIX
264
LXXX
265
LXXXI
266
LXXXII
269
LXXXIII
274
LXXXIV
278
LXXXV
280
LXXXVI
283
LXXXVII
284
LXXXVIII
287
LXXXIX
290
XC
291
XCI
298
XCIII
304
XCIV
309
XCV
310
XCVI
313
XCVII
315
XCVIII
316
XCIX
319
C
327
CI
331
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Myrlie Evers-Williams is the widow of slain civil rights hero Medgar Evers and former chairwoman of the NAACP. She has continued the work of her late husband, and her tireless efforts to bring about social change have kept his memory alive. Myrlie Evers-Williams lives in Bend, Oregon. Manning Marable is Professor of History, Political Science, and Public Policy, at Columbia University. Marable lives in New York City.

Bibliographic information