The Battle of Fair Oaks: Turning Point of McClellan's Peninsula Campaign

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McFarland, Jan 10, 2014 - History - 219 pages
In the spring of 1862, Union Major General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac launched a bloody offensive up the Virginia Peninsula in an effort to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond. This study chronicles the pivotal but often overlooked turning point of the Peninsula Campaign--the Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as Seven Pines. At Fair Oaks, Confederate troops succeeded in driving back Union forces from the edge of Richmond before the Union troops stabilized their position. Though both sides claimed victory, the battle marked the end of the Union offensive. Robert E. Lee, J.E.B. Stuart, and Winfield Scott Hancock all rose to national prominence for their roles at Fair Oaks, while McClellan saw his reputation ruined. In the end, the legacy of Fair Oaks is one of missed chances and faulty execution, ensuring the war would continue for nearly three more years.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
One The Promise of a New Year
7
Two On to Richmond Once More
23
Three Up the Peninsula
41
Four To the Edge of Victory
62
Five Counteroffensive at Fair Oaks
85
Six Another Grim Day of Battle
114
Appendix 1
179
Appendix 2
182
Appendix 3
184
Appendix 4
192
Appendix 5
195
Appendix 6
196
Chapter Notes
197
Bibliography
203

Seven Lee Takes the Offensive
132
Eight Race for the James
151
Epilogue
172

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About the author (2014)

The late Robert P. Broadwater wrote more than 35 books of military history and more than 100 magazine articles dealing with the American Civil War and the Revolutionary War. He lived in Pennsylvania.

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