The Bay-path: A Tale of New England Colonial Life

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G.P. Putnam, 1857 - Electronic book - 418 pages
 

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Page 316 - Refrain from these men and let them alone : for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to naught; but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 44 - For why ? the way of godly men unto the Lord is known : Whereas the way of wicked men shall quite be overthrown.
Page 77 - Agawam went out of doors or changed his position in the fields, or looked up from his labor, or rested on his oars upon the bosom of the river, without turning his eyes to the point at which that path opened from the brow of the wooded hill upon the east ; where now the bell of the huge arsenal tells hourly of the coming of a stranger along the path of time. And when some worn and weary man came in sight, upon his half-starved horse, or two or three pedestrians bending beneath their packs, and swinging...
Page 364 - I am much inclined to think that his sufferings were appointed by God for a further end, namely, as the due punishment of our sins by way of satisfaction to divine justice for man's redemption.
Page 43 - He shall be like a tree that grows Near planted by a river, Which in his season yields his fruit, And his leaf fadeth never : 4 And all he doth shall prosper well.
Page 77 - Indians' hounds of fire, and along the banks of streams that the seine had never dragged. This path was known as the "Bay path," and received its name in the same manner as the multitudinous "old Bay roads" that lead to Boston from every quarter of Massachusetts. It was wonderful what a powerful interest was attached to the Bay path. It was the channel through which laws were communicated, through which flowed news from distant friends, and through which came long loving letters and messages. It...
Page 78 - Path opened from the brow of the wooded hill up on the east, where now the bell of the huge arsenal tells hourly of the coming of a stranger along the path of time. " And when some worn and weary man came in sight, upon his halfstarved horse, or two or three pedestrians, bending beneath their packs and swinging their sturdy staves, were seen approaching, the village was astir from one end to the other. Whoever the comer might be, he was welcomed with a cordiality and universality that was not so...
Page 318 - England where this book was printed and is dispersed, hereby to protest our innocency, as being neither parties nor privy to the writing, composing, printing or divulging thereof, but that on the contrary, we detest and abhor many of the opinions and assertions therein as false, erroneous and heretical, yea, and whatsoever is contained in the said book which are contrary to the...
Page 318 - It was also ordered that Mr. John Norton, of Ipswich, " should be entreated to answer Mr. Pynchon's book with all convenient speed." It was also ordered, — and this casts light upon the motive for these rapid and extreme measures, — that the foregoing declaration " be signed by the Secretary, and...
Page 77 - ... of the river, without turning his eyes to the point at which that path opened from the brow of the wooded hill upon the east; where now the bell of the huge arsenal tells hourly of the coming of a stranger along the path of time. And when some worn and weary man came in sight, upon his halfstarved horse, or two or three pedestrians bending beneath their packs, and swinging their sturdy staves, were seen approaching, the village was astir from one end to the other. Whoever the comer might be,...

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