The Best Australian Poetry 2003

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Macmillan, 2003 - Fiction - 125 pages
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The Best Australian Poetry 2003 is the first in a series of anthologies that will be produced annually by UQP to showcase the very best in contemporary Australian poetry. Each year, a guest editor is invited to select the poems and write an introduction, and the contributing poets will include commentaries to illuminate their work.The inaugural issue contains poems by some of Australia’s most prominent poets including Clive James, Les Murray, and Judith Beveridge, as well as some exciting new voices.
 

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Contents

John Allison Towards the Horizon
4
MTC Cronin The Flower The Thing
18
Judy Johnson Self Pity
33
Emma Lew The Clover Seed Hex
46
Louise Oxley Voice Over
60
Geoff Page Five Poems from A Good Wheat
62
Peter Porter Komikaze
70
Michael Sharkey The Advantages of Daughters
77
R A Simpson Journeys Under the City
83
Norman Talbot The Resurrection at Cookham
89
Maria Zajkowski The Grey Mare the Better Horse
95
Journals Where the Poems Were First Published
122
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About the author (2003)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

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