The Best Investment a Nation Ever Made: A Tribute to the Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate and Defense Highways

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 1998 - History - 40 pages
0 Reviews
Without a first class system of interstate highways, life in America would be far different -- it would be more risky, less prosperous, & lacking in the efficiency & comfort that Americans now enjoy & take for granted. The Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate & Defense Highways, in place & celebrating its 40th anniversary, must surely be the best investment a nation ever made. Consider this: it has saved the lives of at least 187,000 people; it has prevented injuries to nearly 12 million people; it has returned more that $6 in economic productivity for each $1 it cost, & much more. Photos. Charts & tables.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VI
9
VIII
12
IX
15
X
18
XI
19
XII
21
XIII
23
XIV
24
XV
25
XVI
34

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - ... reinstated a policy of spending one-half of a percent of estimated construction budgets on art. Many states have now enacted similar programs, including Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
Page 35 - Licensor to open to the entire trade the use of these patents so licensed at the lowest price consistent with a reasonable profit to the manufacturer, Licensee, the trade and to this Licensor.
Page 3 - On June 29, 1956, President Eisenhower signed the Federal Aid-Highway Act of 1956, which authorized the interstate highway system (later formally named the Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate and Defense Highways). The Act authorized 41,000 miles of high quality highways that were to tie the nation together.
Page 26 - Arkansas", "Colorado", "Delaware", "Florida". "Hawaii", "Illinois". "Iowa". "Kentucky", "Maine", "Massachusetts", "Minnesota", "Missouri", "Nebraska", "New Hampshire". "New Mexico", "North Carolina", "Ohio". "Oregon", "Rhode Island".
Page 39 - Study of Impacts of Highway Capacity Improvements on Air Quality and Energy Consumption.
Page 36 - M. Ishaq Nadiri and Theofanis P. Mamuneas, Contribution of Highway Capital to Industry and National Productivity Growth (Washington, DC: United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, 1996).
Page 4 - High standards were adopted for the interstate highway system. Access to all interstates was to be fully controlled. There would be no intersections or traffic signals. All traffic and railroad crossings would be grade separated, requiring the construction of more than 55,000 bridges. Interstates were to be divided and have at least four wide traffic lanes (two in each direction) and adequate shoulders.
Page 40 - DEPUTY COMMANDER IN CHIEF UNITED STATES TRANSPORTATION COMMAND BEFORE THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE US DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION'S RECOMMENDED NATIONAL HIGHWAY SYSTEM...
Page 4 - pay as you go" system that would rely primarily on federally imposed user fees on motor fuels — the federal user fee per gallon of gasoline was increased by one cent. The federal user fees would provide 90 percent of the cost of construction with the balance being provided primarily by the states.
Page 24 - Users works for better, safer highway transportation through public policy analysis, public information and education, and legislative and regulatory advocacy. It believes that good highways are essential to a strong economy and the costs of improving highway transportation should be borne by the users.

Bibliographic information