The Best of Verity Stob: Highlights of Verity Stob's Famous Columns from .EXE, Dr. Dobb's Journal, and The Register

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Apress, Nov 22, 2006 - Computers - 336 pages
It’s hard to believe now, but there was a time when writing jokes about multi-dispatch inheritance in dynamically typed languages simply wasn’t the glamorous, highly paid profession that it is today. Before Slashdot, before User Friendly and the Joy of Tech, before Futurama, before Old Man Murray, before Dilbert, and before “1001 Surefire Gags about C++ That Will Wow Your Klingon Wedding Guests,” funny for geeks was a criminally underserved market sector. Biro-drawn cartoon strips were the typical fare, all called something like Just Byting Around! or Giga-giggles! These would run for a few months in Practical Computing or PC Handholder or some such ma- zine. After recycling gags revolving around hard drives and floppy disk entendres, these wretched specimens died for lack of inspiration and, I would hope, some vestigial sense of shame. And then there was, thank God, Verity Stob. I remember the first time I read the Stob column. It was 1988, and I was hiding in a fluorescent-lit dungeon in the heart of my university, strumming futilely through the lower-rent academic journals and controlled-circulation tech mags. The first few lines—some throwaway comment about Lisp, I think— had my snorts echoing across the library.
 

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Contents

LIFE BEFORE GUIS
1
How Friendly Is Your Software?
3
The Good Book is KR natch
5
it plunged towards the sea
11
The Maltese Modem
14
Im rather dubious about the natural history underlying this item
19
ANSI and ASCII at this time were acronyms mostly associated
21
Mind you I didnt win
24
Night Mail
131
Cringelys PBS program Triumph of the Nerds was a little
133
The Dogs Breakfast
140
Boys eh? Why does one bother?
147
Waltz
154
Claires Story and Other Tragedies
161
Down the Pole
164
Out to Lunch
167

When I reused the detail about the Basic code in
35
If you arent familiar with the film Brief Encounter try
40
About
44
Not Fairies Footfalls
48
My headline celebrates the now obsolete practice of games manufacturers
50
Anyway the rot set in early
52
THE RASP OF THE
55
Thanks Chris I think that came off beautifully
56
Dear Bill
59
Around and Around
65
Morse Code
75
When Sun Microsystems first introduced Java in the mid 1990s
77
Love it
80
Dont Look Back
83
The Black Eye of the Little
91
Douglas Couplands novel Microserfs made me laugh like a drain
95
8086 and All That
106
The Browser
110
Park Gates
113
At about this time newly crowned prime minister Tony Blair
120
Yocam Hokum
123
AFTER THE
171
This article appeared during the chaddimpling crisis that soured the
176
Wherever He Goes
194
The Devils Netiquette
197
At the Tomb of the IUnknown
201
Double Plus Good?
206
By the way the Ten Immutable Laws of Security are
216
Patter Song
220
Fragments from a New Finnish Epic
241
Soundtrack
252
Damnation Without Relief
256
Cold Comfort Server Farm
259
One After 409
267
A better case for the banning of all poetry is
270
Borland Revelations
275
Patenting by Numbers
279
Confessions of a Spammer
286
This column was commissioned for a proposed relaunch of Byte
295
Laras Last Stand?
299
Too Obscure or Rude
301
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Verity Stob has been a programmer since 1984 and a columnist since 1988. Her column appeared in the "cult" (i.e. defunct) British programming journal .EXE Magazine until 2000, and has since adorned the granddaddy of programmers' rags, Dr. Dobb's Journal. Stob's work has also appeared on the popular IT news website, The Register. Miss Stob lives and works in London, U.K. Her face remains hidden.

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