The Big Wave

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Aug 21, 2012 - Juvenile Fiction - 57 pages
5 Reviews
The author of The Good Earth tells a poignant story about two boys whose friendship and courage help them survive an overwhelming tragedy
On a mountainside in Japan, two boys enjoy a humble life governed by age-old customs. Jiya belongs to a family of fishermen; his best friend, Kino, farms rice. But when a neighboring volcano erupts and a tidal wave swallows their village—including Jiya’s family—life as they know it is changed forever. The orphaned Jiya must learn to come to terms with his grief. Now facing a profoundly different life than the one he’d always taken for granted, he must decide on a new way forward. Written with graceful simplicity, The Big Wave won the Children’s Book Award of the Child Study Association of America when it was first released. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tess_schoolmarm - LibraryThing

A short story by Pearl S. Buck tells the story of Kino and Jiya, best friends. Jiya's family is killed by a typhoon and he is taken into Kino's family where he grows up and learns to deal with grief ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AbundaBookworms - LibraryThing

This is a sweet international view of death and life and all that comes in between. I think it would be a great resource for anyone trying to deal with loss. The father has inspirational words on ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
Chapter
Chapter Four
A Biography of Pearl S Buck
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973) was a bestselling and Nobel Prize–winning author. Her classic novel The Good Earth (1931) was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and William Dean Howells Medal. Born in Hillsboro, West Virginia, Buck was the daughter of missionaries and spent much of the first half of her life in China, where many of her books are set. In 1934, civil unrest in China forced Buck back to the United States. Throughout her life she worked in support of civil and women’s rights, and established Welcome House, the first international, interracial adoption agency. In addition to her highly acclaimed novels, Buck wrote two memoirs and biographies of both of her parents. For her body of work, Buck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938, the first American woman to have done so. She died in Vermont.