The Black Americans: A History in Their Own Words

Front Cover
Milton Meltzer
Harper Collins, May 7, 1987 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 306 pages
‘Meltzer has produced [and updated] a single volume [a condensation of his three-volume In Their Own Words] that covers three and a half centuries of black life in the United States, consisting of source materials: letters, speeches, newspaper articles, and book excerpts. From this collage a vivid picture emerges of the power, passion, and pride of black life.’ —C.

Notable Children's Books of 1984 (ALA)
100 Favorite Paperbacks of 1989 (IRA/CBC)
Notable 1984 Children's Trade Books in Social Studies (NCSS/CBC)
Children's Books of 1984 (Library of Congress)

 

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Contents

Walkers Appeal
14
Slavery Days
27
Why Am I a Slave?
41
On the Underground Railroad
55
Die in a More Noble Cause?
69
To My Old Master
82
When Freedom Come
86
His Crime Was His Color
103
We ReturnFighting
185
Free Within Ourselves
198
No Rent Money
216
We Gonna Make This a Union Town Yet
230
March on Washington
240
Oh Brothers If You Only Knew
253
Aint Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Round
265
That Is All There Is Its the Work
275

Justice Demands It
119
Cast Down Your Bucket Where You Are
135
No Cowards or Trucklers
148
Want to Get Out
167
Troubled on Every Side
284
A NOTE ON SOURCES
295
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Milton Meltzer, a Christopher Award and Jane Addams Children's Book Award winner, is the author of over eighty books in the fields of history, biography, and social reform. His most recent books are The Amazing Potato, a 1993 ALA Notable Children's Book, Gold and Hold Your Horses!. He lives in New York City.

Winner of the 2001 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal

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