The Black Book: The True Political Philosophy of Malcolm X (El Hajj Malik El Shabazz)

Front Cover
Yussuf Naim Kly
Clarity Press, Jan 1, 1986 - Philosophy - 91 pages
.Now in its sixth printing, this highly popular book on the great African-American Muslim illustrates the influence of his Islamic faith and his international experience upon his constantly expanding political vision. The first to present a comprehensive analysis that integrates the developing vision of the man, Malcolm X, with the man he became, El Hajj Malik El Shabazz, it provides an in-depth analysis of Malcolm's directives on why the African-American struggle for national liberation and self-determination is necessary, how it should be carried on, and why it can succeed. "The Islamic force tends to act against nationalism as introduced by western European development and socialism as introduced in the development of the USSR and China. It is both anti-nationalist and anti-materialistic. All aspects of societal life are viewed as an integral part of the whole, the din, the one God. Thus all aspects of life in the state must be theoretically harmonized so as to achieve spiritual peace, happiness and total submission to the will of one God. Both the governing elite and masses are theoretically equalized by rules and principles from outside of society (the Qur'an and Sunnah)..." from The Black Book: The Political Philosophy of Malcolm X

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Contents

The Methodology
1
lNTRODUCTION
7
The importance of Life
13
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (1986)

Kly is a professor of international law and human justice at the University of Regina in Canada. He is also chairman of IHRAAM (The International Human Rights Association of American Minorities), a member of the Jamahir Society for Culture & Philosophy in Vienna, Austria, and an alumni of The Hague Academy of International Law.

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, and the son of a Baptist minister, Malcolm Little grew up with violence. Whites killed several members of his family, including his father. As a youngster, he went to live with a sister in Boston where he started a career of crime that he continued in New York's Harlem as a drug peddler and pimp. While serving a prison term for burglary in 1952, he converted to Islam and undertook an intensive program of study and self-improvement, movingly detailed in "Autobiography of Malcolm X." He wrote constantly to Elijah Muhammad (Elijah Poole, 1897--1975), head of the black separatist Nation of Islam, which already claimed the loyalty of several of his brothers and sisters. Upon release from prison, Little went to Detroit, met with Elijah Muhammad, and dropped the last name Little, adopting X to symbolize the unknown African name his ancestors had been robbed of when they were enslaved. Soon he was actively speaking and organizing as a Muslim minister. In his angry and articulate preaching, he condemned white America for its treatment of blacks, denounced the integration movement as black self-delusion, and advocated black control of black communities. During the turbulent 1960's, he was seen as inflammatory and dangerous. In 1963, a storm broke out when he called President Kennedy's assassination a case of "chickens coming home to roost," meaning that white violence, long directed against blacks, had now turned on itself. The statement was received with fury, and Elijah Muhammad denounced him publicly. Shocked and already disillusioned with the leader because of his reputed involvement with several women, Malcolm X went on a pilgrimage to Mecca and then traveled to several African countries, where he was received as a fellow Muslim. When he returned home, he was bearing a new message: Islam is a religion that welcomes and unites people of all races in the Oneness of Allah. On the night of February 21, 1965, as he was preaching at Harlem's Audubon Ballroom, he was assassinated.

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