The Blithedale Romance, Volume 2

Front Cover
Chapman and Hall, 1852
6 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
1
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lucybrown - LibraryThing

Before 200 channels of TV, radio, computers, and journalism, writers could write the way Hawthorne wrote. Readers had the patience to make their way through sentences so dense that you could chew them ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eadieburke - LibraryThing

I enjoyed this book and found that The Blithedale Romance was full of mystery and intriguing characters.The book was based upon Hawthorne's experiences at Brook Farm, a short-lived utopian community ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
26
III
45
IV
63
V
81
VI
96
VII
115
VIII
127
IX
144
X
170
XI
192
XII
212
XIII
231
XIV
246
XV
266
XVI
281

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 276 - As they approached me, I observed in Hollingsworth's face a depressed and melancholy look, that seemed habitual ; — the powerfully-built man showed a self-distrustful weakness, and a childlike or childish tendency to press close, and closer still, to the side of the slender woman whose arm was within his.
Page 279 - Hollingsworth's character and errors, is simply this, — that, admitting what is called philanthropy, when adopted as a profession, to be often useful by its energetic impulse to society at large, it is perilous to the individual whose ruling passion, in one exclusive channel, it thus becomes. It ruins, or is fearfully apt to ruin, the heart, the rich juices of which God never meant should be pressed violently out, and distilled into alcoholic liquor, by an unnatural process, but should render life...
Page 84 - That cold tendency, between instinct and intellect, which made me pry with a speculative interest into people's passions and impulses, appeared to have gone far towards unhumanizing my heart.
Page 54 - Review," the merchants, the politicians, the Cambridge men, and all those respectable old blockheads, who still, in this intangibility and mistiness of affairs, kept a death-grip on one or two ideas which had not come into vogue since yesterday morning.
Page 214 - Hollingsworth, — Zenobia, — I have just returned to Blithedale," said I, " and had no thought of finding you here. We shall meet again at the house. I will retire." " This place is free to you," answered Hollingsworth. "As free as to ourselves," added Zenobia. "This long while past, you have been following up your game, groping for human emotions in the dark corners of the heart.
Page 218 - Zenobia's whole character and history ; the true nature of her mysterious connection with Westervelt ; her later purposes towards Hollingsworth, and, reciprocally, his in reference to her ; and, finally, the degree in which Zenobia had been cognizant of the plot against Priscilla, and what, at last, had been the real object of that scheme.
Page 236 - Destiny, to boot, make common cause against the woman who swerves one hair's breadth out of the beaten track. Yes ; and add (for I may as well own it, now) that, with that one hair's breadth, she goes all astray and never sees the world in its true aspect afterwards ' ' " This last is too stern a moral,
Page 281 - I have made but a poor and dim figure in my own narrative, establishing no separate interest, and suffering my colorless life to take its hue from other lives.
Page 14 - All the separate action of woman is, and ever has been, and always shall be, false, foolish, vain, destructive of her own best and holiest qualities...
Page 1 - OUR Sundays at Blithedale were not ordinarily kept with such rigid observance as might have befitted the descendants of the Pilgrims, whose high enterprise, as we sometimes flattered ourselves, we had taken up, and were carrying it onward and aloft to a point which they never dreamed of attaining.

Bibliographic information