The Bloomsbury Group: A Collection of Memoirs and Commentary

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Stanford Patrick Rosenbaum
University of Toronto Press, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 495 pages
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Bloomsbury, wrote E.M. Forster in 1929, 'is the only genuine movement in English civilization.' By this time the group's influence had been extended from fiction, biography, economics, and painting through literary, social, and art criticism to publishing and journalism. Partly as a result of its influence, Bloomsbury has been widely misunderstood as a cultural, social, and even sexual phenomenon by both its friends and its detractors. As S.P. Rosenbaum observes in the foreword to this revised and expanded edition, Bloomsbury cannot be reduced to a creed or argued away because of its complexity. 'What Bloomsbury stood for is what they were and what they did, ' he writes, 'That is why a collection of descriptions of the Bloomsbury's lives and works may be the only wholly satisfactory way of defining the Bloomsbury Group.'

The first section of the volume, Bloomsbury on Bloomsbury, contains the basic memoirs and discussions of the Group itself by the original members, Virginia and Leonard Woolf, Vanessa and Clive Bell, E.M. Forster, Roger Fry, John Maynard Keynes, Lytton Strachey, Duncan Grant, Desmond MacCarthy, and others. These recollections range from unpublished private correspondence and diaries to formal autobiographies. Published here for the first time is the remainder of Desmond MacCarthy's unfinished Bloomsbury memoir. Virginia Woolf's complete Memoir Club paper on Old Bloomsbury and excerpts from her letters and diaries also appear, as do letters about Bloomsbury by Lytton Strachey, Roger Fry, E.M. Forster, and Vanessa Bell. The second section, Bloomsberries, contains observations on individuals by other members of the group and their children. Virginia Woolf's hitherto unknown biographical fantasy on J.M. Keynes is newly added, as are accounts of Molly MacCarthy, Lydia Lopokova, and David Garnett. Bloomsbury Observed, the last section, consists of reminiscences of the group mainly by their contemporaries. Additions to the revised edition include an early anonymous newspaper account of Bloomsbury, and observations by Quentin Bell, Beatrice Webb, Gerald Brenan, Christopher Isherwood, Frances Partridge, and others.

Also included are an updated chronology recording the principal events in the careers of Bloomsbury's members and an enlarged bibliography.

 

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User Review  - DeadFred - LibraryThing

This book is good . Especially for the Bloomsbury Group readers. Excerpts from writings of the 'Old' Bloomsbury Group, memories from the Memoir Club , reflective writings on specific moments, thought ... Read full review

Contents

Monday June 26th 1916
17
My Early Beliefs
82
Virginia Woolf and the Beginnings
97
Letters
113
Cambridge Friends and Influences
123
Introduction 115?
157
EM Forster by Virginia Woolf
193
Clive Bell by David Gamett
213
Bloomsbury in Spain and England
343
A Bloomsbury Childhood
367
Childhood on the Edge of Bloomsbury
380
Bloomsbury in the Thirties a
392
Evenings in Tavistock Square 4 02
409
Bloomsbury and Their Houses
416
The Significance of Charleston
430
Remarks on Bloomsbury
440

Virginia Woolf by E M Forster
222
Virginia and Leonard Wooli by Angelica Garnett
248
Lytton Strachey by Leonard Woolf
255
John Maynard Keynes by Virginia Woolf f
272
David Garnett by Henrietta Garnett
297
Bloombury Observed
305
Identifications
451
Headnote References
463
Bibliographies
473
Index of Names and Works I
485
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

S.P. Rosenbaum is professor emeritus of English Literature, University of Toronto, and a fellow of The Royal Society of Canada. He is the author of several books on the Bloomsbury Group, most recently Edwardian Bloomsbury: The Early Literary History of the Bloomsbury Group, Volume Two .

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