The Bokhara Victims

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Chapman and Hall, 1845 - Asia, Central - 307 pages
 

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Page 168 - tis no matter; Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on, how then ? Can honour set to a leg ? No. Or an arm ? No. Or take away the grief of a wound? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery then ? No. What is honour? A word. What is in that word, honour ? What is that honour ? Air. A trim reckoning ! — Who hath it ? He that died o
Page 169 - Wednesday. Doth he feel it ? No. Doth he hear it ? No. Is it insensible then ? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living ? No. Why? Detraction will, not suffer it: — therefore I'll none of it: Honour is a mere scutcheon, and so ends my catechism.
Page 339 - And the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of Pul king of Assyria, and the spirit of Tilgath-pilneser king of Assyria, and he carried them away, even the Reubenites, and the Gadites, and the half tribe of Manasseh, and brought them unto Halah, and Habor, and Hara, and to the river Gozan, unto this day.
Page 255 - SIR, I am directed by the Earl of Aberdeen to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the...
Page 66 - I do, the character of the inhabitants of Bokhara, I am fully convinced that the report of their having been put to death, is exceedingly doubtful — much more so by the source from which the report originated. If, therefore, one of you, gentlemen, would be inclined to accompany me to Bokhara, or merely pay the expenses of my journey...
Page 128 - I set out for Bokhara to ransom the lives of two officers, Colonel Stoddart and Captain Conolly ; but both of them were murdered many months previous to my departure, and I do not know whether this blood of mine will not be spilt. I do not supplicate for my own safety ; but, Monarchs, two hundred thousand Persian slaves, many of them people of high talent, sigh in the kingdom of Bokhara. Endeavour to effect their liberation, and I shall rejoice in the grave that my blood has been thus the cause of...
Page 21 - leave the field he had won!'' Did such an order reach him ? I say, No ! Was it ever written ? No copy of any such letter was to be found among the mass of documents which were submitted to me by the Earl of Aberdeen's direction — no document that could lead me to believe that any — the slightest — ' effort had been made by the British government in behalf of this faithful envoy. And why should there be ? Who was Colonel Stoddart ? Was he allied to the aristocracy ? Had he parliamentary or other...
Page 204 - A long time ago the people of this island, upon coming out one morning, saw part of a ship on the reef opposite to Paiow, where it held together till the middle of the day, when it was broken by the sea, fell to pieces, and large parts of it floated on shore along the coast. The ship got on the reef in the night, when it blew a tremendous hurricane, which broke down a considerable number of our fruit-trees.
Page 38 - Amir summoned Colonel Stoddart, and asked him whether the Russians were likely to treat him well, and what he thought of the proposal. Colonel Stoddart replied, 'The Russians would, undoubtedly, treat me well, but, when my own government demands me, what will your highness answer!
Page 4 - ... he was a man of impulse, with no more power of self-control than an infant. To attack or defend a fortress, no better man than Captain Stoddart could have been found ; but for a diplomatic mission, requiring coolness and self-command, a man less adapted to the purpose could not readily have been met with.

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