The Book of Dead Philosophers

Front Cover
Melbourne Univ. Publishing, 2008 - Death - 298 pages
1 Review
Diogenes died by holding his breath. Plato allegedly died of a lice infestation. Diderot choked to death on an apricot. Nietzsche made a long, soft-brained and dribbling descent into oblivion after kissing a horse in Turin. From the self-mocking haikus of Zen masters on their deathbeds to the last words (gasps) of modern-day sages, The Book of Dead Philosophers chronicles the deaths of almost 200 philosophers-tales of weirdness, madness, suicide, murder, pathos and bad luck. In this elegant and amusing book, Simon Critchley argues that the question of what constitutes a 'good death' has been the central preoccupation of philosophy since ancient times. As he brilliantly demonstrates, looking at what the great thinkers have said about death inspires a life-affirming enquiry into the meaning and possibility of human happiness. In learning how to die, we learn how to live.
 

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The book of dead philosophers

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Critchley (philosophy, New Sch. for Social Research; Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance) maintains that people today are terrified by death: we fear total annihilation ... Read full review

Review: The Book of Dead Philosophers

User Review  - José-antonio Orosco - Goodreads

Those expecting a brief history of philosophy from this book will be disappointed. But it does serve as a reminder that, even though philosophers reflect on the meaning of life, they die mostly in meaningless ways just like the rest of us. Read full review

Contents

Thales 5
5
Timycha 11 Heracleitus 11 Aeschlyus 12
12
Prodicus
20
Theophrastus 28
28
Pyrrho 37 Zeno of Citium 39
39
Lucretius
46
Kongzi Confucius 51 Laozi Lao Tzu 53 Mozi
53
Han Feizi 59
59
Hobbes 139 Descartes 141
141
La Rochefoucauld 146 Pascal 147 Geulincx 149
149
Anne Conway 150 Locke 151 Damaris Cudworth 154
154
Malebranche 159 Leibniz 159 Vico
161
Montesquieu 167
167
Rousseau 177
177
Kant 185 Burke
188
Schiller 192 Fichte 193 Hegel 194
194

Seneca 66 Petronius 69 Epictetus 70
70
Marcus Aurelius 73 Plotinus 74 Hypatia
76
St Paul 81 Origen 83 St Antony 84
84
St Gregory of Nyssa 87 St Augustine 88 Boethius
91
The Venerable Bede 97
97
Solomon Ibn Gabirol 103
103
Albert the Great 111 St Thomas Aquinas 111
111
William of Ockham
117
Machiavelli 123
123
Petrus Ramus 129
129
Bacon 134 Campanella
135
Heine 202 Feuerbach 202 Stirner
203
Kierkegaard 210
210
Freud 217 Bergson 219 Dewey
219
Santayana 224 Croce 225 Gentile 226
226
Wittgenstein 232 Heidegger 234
234
Gadamer 243
243
Beauvoir 252 Arendt
253
Camus 262 Ricoeur 263 Barthes
263
Deleuze 270 Foucault 271 Baudrillard
273
LAST WORDS
279
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About the author (2008)

English philosopher Simon Critchley was born on February 27, 1960. He earned his BA (1985) and PhD (1988) from the University of Essex in England. Critchley received his M.Phil. from France's University of Nice in 1987. Critchley has held university fellow, lecturer, reader, and professor positions and was the Director of the Centre for Theoretical Studies at the University of Essex. Additionally, Critchley was President of the British Society for Phenomenology from 1994-1999, he held a Humboldt Research Fellowship in Philosophy at the University of Frankfurt, and was Programme Director of the Collège International de Philosophie. Since 2004 Critchley has taught philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York. Critchley's publications include "The Ethics of Deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas," the collection of essays "Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity," "Continental Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction," "On Humour," "Things Merely Are," "Infinitely Demanding," and the New York Times bestseller "The Book of Dead Philosophers".

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