The Book of Naturalists: An Anthology of the Best Natural History

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William Beebe
Princeton University Press, Apr 21, 1988 - Nature - 499 pages
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Anyone curious about animals, nature, or the history of biology will find much of interest in this ample and varied collection. Reflecting his infectious enthusiasm for "the best natural history," Beebe's personal assortment of favorites includes excerpts from massive sources, such as Audubon and Darwin, and intriguing pieces from lesser known authors most of us would not normally encounter. Arranged in chronological order, the small masterpieces here range from Aristotle to Rachel Carson. Each of them is introduced by an incisive and sometimes humorous description of its author.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
AN UNKNOWN MAODALENIAN
11
The Birth of Pearls
19
The Migration of Birds
26
Little Animals
35
From Bats and Manatees to Cats and Camels
45
The Rattle Snake
54
The Sloth
62
Penguins
263
Old Friends in New Places
283
Chagola
291
Foxes Owls and Polar Bears
308
Elephant Friends and Foes
334
The Sea Otter
345
Two Lives
355
The Emergence of the HalfMen
363

The Wild Turkey
68
Part II
87
From Bahia and the Galapagos
94
Mimicry and Other
109
The Aims of
122
On a Piece of Chalk
213
Foreword to A nookLovers Holi
234
About Tadpoles
243
The Termitodoxa
250
The Uniqueness of Man
395
The Big Almendro
427
The Seeds of Life
441
Playboys of the Western World
455
In Defense of Octopuses
465
Odyssey of the Eel
478
Selected Biographical Material
497
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About the author (1988)

William Beebe, born Charles William Beebe (July 29, 1877 - June 4, 1962)[2] was anAmerican naturalist, ornithologist, marine biologist, entomologist, explorer, and author. He is remembered for the numerous expeditions he conducted for the New York Zoological Society, his deep dives in the Bathysphere, and his prolific scientific writing for both academic and popular audiences.

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