Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 12: 1912-14

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University of Illinois Press, 1982 - Social Science - 544 pages
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The memoirs and accounts of the Black educator are presented with letters, speeches, personal documents, and other writings reflecting his life and career.
 

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Contents

Sept 1912 To Ernest Ten Eyck Attwell
5
Oct 1912 A Statement on Jack Johnson for the United Press Association
43
Nov 1912 To Anson Phelps Stokes Jr
44
Nov 1912 An Invitation
46
Nov 1912 From Anson Phelps Stokes Jr
47
Nov 1912 To Emmett Jay Scott
48
Nov 1912 From Charles William Anderson
49
Nov 1912 From Hopson Owen Murfee 5o 9 Nov 1912 To Anson Phelps Stokes Jr
52
Jan 1913 Ralph Waldo Tyler to Emmett Jay Scott
99
Jan 1913 From Frank W Crenshaw
100
Jan 1913 To Frank W Crenshaw
102
Jan 1913 FromF C Lane IO2 16 Jan 1913 From Robert Curtis Ogden
104
Jan 1913 To Samuel Laing Williams
105
Mar 1913 To the Editor of the New York Age
149
May 1913 To Mabel Delano Clapp Lord
182
May 1913 To Amanda Ferguson Johnston
189

Nov 1912 From Anson Phelps Stokes Jr
53
Nov 1912 From Whitefield McKinlay Francis James Grimke and Archibald Henry Grimke
54
Nov 1912 Extracts from an Address at the Opening of the Mound Bayou CottonOil Mill
55
Nov 1912 From James Carroll Napier
60
Nov 1912 From P L Carmouche
61
An Article in The Century
64
Dec 1912 From Robert Ezra Park
82
Dec 1912 To Naoichi Masaoka
84
Dec 1912 From Charles William Anderson
85
Dec 1912 To Walter Hines Page
86
Dec 1912 Ralph Waldo Tyler to Emmett Jay Scott
87
Dec 1912 To Charles Dewey Hilles
89
Dec 1912 To Gilchrist Stewart
90
Dec 1912 To Roger Nash Baldwin
91
Dec 1912 To Julius Rosenwald
92
Dec 1912 From Emmett Jay Scott
93
Dec 1912 From George Washington Carver
95
A List of Pledges to the Tuskegee Institute FiveYear Fund
96
June 1913 From N Clark Smith
198
June 1913 From Mrs W F Behr
204
and Ernest Ten Eyck Attwell
276
Sept 1913 A Circular Announcing a Speech
282
Oct 1913 To Bowser Company
320
Oct 1913 From Lucius E Johnson
326
Nov 1913 From George Ruffin Bridgeforth
350
ca Nov 1913 A Circular Announcing The Negro Farmer
362
Dec 1913 From P C Jackson
372
Jan 1914 To Emmett Jay Scott
417
Jan 1914 To William Gaston Caperton
425
Feb 1914 From Cornelius Bailey Hosmer
439
Feb 1914 From George Wesley Harris
445
Feb 1914 A Press Release
457
Mar 1914 To Members of the Alabama Colored
464
BIBLIOGRAPHY
491
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Booker Taliaferro Washington, 1856 - 1915 Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hales Ford, Virginia, near Roanoke. After the U.S. government freed all slaves in 1865, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia. There, Washington worked in coal mines and salt furnaces. He went on to attend the Hampton, Virginia Normal and Agricultural Institute from 1872-1875 before joining the staff in 1879. In 1881 he was selected to head the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, a new teacher-training school for blacks, which he transformed into a thriving institution, later named Tuskegee University. His controversial conviction that blacks could best gain equality in the U.S. by improving their economic situation through education rather than by demanding equal rights was termed the Atlanta Compromise, because Washington accepted inequality and segregation for blacks in exchange for economic advancement. Washington advised two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, on racial problems and policies, as well as influencing the appointment of several blacks to federal offices. Washington became a shrewd political leader and advised not only Presidents, but also members of Congress and governors. He urged wealthy people to contribute to various black organizations. He also owned or financially supported many black newspapers. In 1900, Washington founded the National Negro Business League to help black business firms. Washington fought silently for equal rights, but was eventually usurped by those who ideas were more radical and demanded more action. Washington was replaced by W. E. B. Du Bois as the foremost black leader of the time, after having spent long years listening to Du Bois deride him for his placation of the white man and the plight of the negro. He died in 1915.

Smock, former historian of the U.S. House of Representatives.

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