The Borderland of Imbecility: Medicine, Society and the Fabrication of the Feeble Mind in Late Victorian and Edwardian England

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, 2000 - Social Science - 273 pages
0 Reviews
Feeble-mindedness was a late Victorian and Edwardian obsession. Unlike madness, idiocy has not been much written about, but it has its own tragic story. This book examines both how and why certain children and adults were labeled as "feeble-minded" and segregated into special schools and colonies in late Victorian and Edwardian England. This challenging book exploits a rich variety of archival sources and a wide range of contemporary medical, educational, and parliamentary material.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The birth of the borderland
21
The scientific morality of permanent care
53
Images of deviance
89
Class and contamination
129
Reclaiming the borderland
165
The eclipse of liberty
203
Bibliography
237
Index
263
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2000)

Mark Jackson is Senior Lecturer in the Center for Medical History at the University of Exeter.

Bibliographic information