The Bottlenose Dolphin

Front Cover
Stephen Leatherwood, Randall R. Reeves
Academic Press, 1990 - Science - 653 pages
Because of their exposure in marine parks, movies, and television as well as their presence in tropical and warm-temperature waters around the world, bottlenose dolphins are among the most familiar of marine mammals. Since they are relatively easy to obtain and they thrive in captivity, these dolphins have been used in a great variety of studies. Work with the bottlenose has provided insight into the sensory mechanisms, communication systems, energetics, reproduction, anatomy, and other aspects of cetacean biology. This volume presents the most recent biological and behavioral discoveries of bottlenose dolphins from different regions and compares bottlenose dolphins as a group with other species of animals.

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Contents

The Fossil Record and Evolutionary Part IV
3
Preliminary Observations
143
Axial Muscles and Connective Sandra L Hersh Daniel K Odell
155
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

John E. Reynolds III is chairman of the Marine Mammal Commission and the senior scientist at Mote Marine Laboratory. William F. Perrin is a senior scientist with the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, adjunct professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and editor emeritus of Marine Mammal Science. Randall R. Reeves is one of the Okapi Wildlife Associates, the author of several books, and chair of the IUCN Cetacean Specialists Group. Suzanne Montgomery is a staff scientist, and Timothy J. Ragen is director of research, at the Marine Mammal Commission.

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