The Bride Wore Red

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 15, 1997 - Fiction - 224 pages
1 Review
The Bride Wore Red is a collection of short stories about an extended Indian family in the United States - cousins from New Delhi who marry European-Americans, and parents who come to live with them in suburban New Jersey and California. The stories are interconnected, providing the cumulative satisfactions of a novel. The stories are about love and conflict in cross-cultural marriage. They also are about a universal immigrant experience: loyalty to heritage versus the desire to be part of one's new land. The book begins with the first mixed marriage in the family - Deshi and Sally - in New Delhi. They establish their home in the United States. Deshi's cousins also come to America and throw off the custom of arranged marriage, Hermeet marrying Goodie, a Scandinavian-American, and Surinder marrying Grace. The Bride Wore Red follows these three marriages for three decades, from the late 1960s to the present, as the characters confront the often amusing, often poignant nuances of cross-cultural family life.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

BRIDE WORE RED

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Sethi's (English, Rider Univ.) first collection of short stories takes up the subject of the cross-cultural marriages of men from New Delhi to European American women and the ensuing harmonies and ... Read full review

Contents

The Bride Wore Red
1
The Pilgrimage
17
The WhiteHaired Girl
51
Gudruns Saga
67
Grace
82
Bridgewater Burning Ground
99
The Housewarming
133
A White Womans Burden
147
Missing Persons
174
The White Widow
204
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1997)

Robbie Clipper Sethi is aprofessor of English at Rider University, New Jersey. She met her husband, a Punjabi Sikh, while earning her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. Her stories have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The Literary Review, California Quarterly, and The Massachusetts Review.

Bibliographic information