The British and American Drama of To-day: Outlines for Their Study : Suggestions, Questions, Biographies, and Bibliographies for Use in Connection with the Study of the More Important Plays

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H. Holt, 1915 - American drama - 315 pages
 

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Page 100 - Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me, from the crown to the toe, top-full Of direst cruelty : make thick my blood, Stop up th...
Page 100 - The effect and it ! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers, Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, 50 Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry 'Hold, hold!
Page 48 - I took the drama, the most objective form known to art, and made it as personal a mode of expression as the lyric or the sonnet; at the same time I widened its range and enriched its characterisation.
Page 196 - A pair of lace boots with lengthy heels on them and brassy eyes.
Page 61 - Have some bread and butter. The bread and butter is for Gwendolen. Gwendolen is devoted to bread and butter. JACK {Advancing to table and helping himself] And very good bread and butter it is too. ALGERNON. Well, my dear fellow, you need not eat as if you were going to eat it all. You behave as if you were married to her already.
Page 131 - A drama must be shaped so as to have a spire of meaning. Every grouping of life and character has its inherent moral; and the business of the dramatist is so to pose the group as to bring that moral poignantly to the light of day.
Page 65 - Unpleasant. The reason is pretty obvious ; their dramatic power is used to force the spectator to face unpleasant facts. No doubt all plays which deal sincerely with humanity must wound the monstrous conceit which it is the business of romance to flatter.
Page 322 - It is not often nowadays that a theatrical b"k can be met with so free from gush and mere eulogy, or so weighted by common sense ... an excellent chronological appendix and full index . . . uncommonly useful for reference.
Page 131 - To set before the public no cut-and-dried codes, but the phenomena of life and character, selected and combined, but not distorted, by the dramatist's outlook, set down without fear, favour, or prejudice, leaving the public to draw such poor moral as nature may afford.
Page 194 - I think, is of importance, for in countries where the imagination of the people, and the language they use, is rich and living, it is possible for a writer to be rich and copious in his words, and at the same time to give the reality, which is the root of all poetry, in a comprehensive and natural form.

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