The British Drama: Illustrated, Volume 1

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John Dicks, 1886 - English drama
 

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Page 228 - Observe me, Sir Anthony. I would by no means wish a daughter of mine to be a progeny of learning. I don't think so much learning becomes a young woman. For instance, I would never let her meddle with Greek, or Hebrew, or algebra, or simony, or fluxions, or paradoxes, or such inflammatory branches of learning; neither would it be necessary for her to handle any of your mathematical, astronomical, diabolical instruments.
Page 68 - They boast they come but to improve our state, enlarge our thoughts, and free us from the yoke of error ! Yes ; they will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride. They offer us their protection : yes; such protection as vultures give to lambs — covering and devouring them...
Page 86 - You have nothing to fear from him, I assure you. You'd adore him if you knew how heartily he despises me. My aunt knows it too, and has undertaken to court me for him, and actually begins to think she has made a conquest.
Page 108 - This is the place, the centre of the grove ; Here stands the oak, the monarch of the wood. How sweet and solemn is this midnight scene The silver moon, unclouded, holds her way Through skies, where I could count each little star. The fanning west wind scarcely stirs the leaves ; The river, rushing o'er its pebbled bed, Imposes silence, with a stilly sound. In such a place as this, at such an hour, If ancestry can be in...
Page 281 - Burthensome to itself, a few years longer, To lose it, may be, at last in a lewd quarrel For some new friend, treacherous and false as thou art ! No, this vile world and I have long been jangling, And cannot part on better terms than now, When only men like thee are fit to live in't.
Page 90 - In the first place, I shall be seen, and that is no small advantage to a girl who brings her face to market. Then I shall perhaps make an acquaintance, and that's no small victory gained over one who never addresses any but the wildest of her sex.
Page 270 - Indeed, my lord, I dare not. My heart, that awes me, is too much my master : Three years are past since first our vows were plighted, During which time the world must bear me witness, I've treated Belvidera like your daughter...
Page 231 - Zounds ! sirrah ?. the lady shall be as ugly as I choose : she shall have a hump on each shoulder ; she shall be as crooked as the crescent ; her one eye shall roll like the bull's in Cox's museum ; she shall have a skin like a mummy, and the beard of a Jew ; she shall be all this, sirrah ; yet I'll make you ogle her all day, and sit up all night, to write sonnets on her beauty.
Page 269 - I received you, Courted, and sought to raise you to your merits : My house, my table, nay my fortune too, My very self, was yours; you might have used me To your best service.
Page 103 - One stormy night, as I remember well, The wind and rain beat hard upon our roof: Red came the river down, and loud and oft The angry spirit of the water shriek'd.

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