The British drama

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Page 271 - Trifles, as liberty to pay and receive visits to and from whom I please; to write and receive letters without interrogatories or wry faces on your part; to wear what I please, and choose conversation with regard only to my own taste; to have no obligation upon me to converse with wits that I don't like, because they are your acquaintance, or to be intimate with fools, because they may be your relations...
Page 271 - Let us never visit together, nor go to a play together; but let us be very strange and well-bred: let us be as strange as if we had been married a great while; and as well bred as if we were not married at all.
Page 20 - ... till they could all play very near, or altogether as well as myself. This done, say the enemy were forty thousand strong, we twenty would come into the field the tenth of March, or thereabouts, and we would challenge twenty of the enemy ; they could not in their...
Page 35 - t, I will. Mam. Ha ! why ? Do you think I fable with you ? I assure you, He that has once the flower of the sun, The perfect ruby, which we call elixir, Not only can do that, but, by its virtue, Can confer honour, love, respect, long life ; Give safety, valour, yea, and victory, To whom he will. In eight and twenty days, I '11 make an old man of fourscore, a child.
Page 33 - And I would know by art, sir, of your worship, Which way I should make my door, by necromancy, And where my shelves; and which should be for boxes, And which for pots. I would be glad to thrive, sir: And I was wish'd* to your worship by a gentleman, One Captain Face, that says you know men's planets. And their good angels, and their bad.
Page 305 - Husbands and wives will drive distinct trades, and care and pleasure separately occupy the family. Coffee-houses will be full of smoke and stratagem. And the cropt prentice, that sweeps his master's shop in the morning, may, ten to one, dirty his sheets before night. But there are two things that you. will see very strange; which are wanton wives with their legs at liberty, and tame cuckolds with chains about their necks.
Page 63 - I much hope it. These were your father's words. If e'er my son Follow the war, tell him it is a school Where all the principles tending to honour, Are taught if truly followed...
Page 261 - But I told my lady as you instructed me, Sir, that I had a prospect of seeing Sir Rowland your uncle; and that I would put...
Page 275 - O madam, if you knew but what he promised me, and how he assured me your ladyship should come to no damage!— Or else the wealth of the Indies should not have bribed me to conspire against so good, so sweet, so kind a lady as you have been to me. Lady Wish. No damage! What, to betray me, to marry me to a cast servingman ! to make me a receptacle, an hospital for a decayed pimp! No damage!
Page 263 - Humph (says he), I hear you are laying designs against me too (says he), and Mrs. Millamant is to marry my uncle (he does not suspect a word of your ladyship) ; but (says he) I'll fit you for that. I warrant you (says he) I'll hamper you for that (says he) ; you and your old frippery too (says he) ; I'll handle you — Lady Wish.

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