The British Merchant; Or, Commerce Preserv'd: In Three Volumes, Volume 2

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John Darby in Bartholomew-Close, 1721 - France - 378 pages
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Page 81 - Enemy aforementioned to neutral Places; but also from one Place belonging to an Enemy, to another Place belonging to an Enemy, whether they be under the Jurisdiction of the same Prince or under Several...
Page 85 - ... masts, planks, boards and beams of what trees soever; and all other things proper either for building or repairing ships, and all other goods whatever which have not been worked into the form of any instrument...
Page 43 - Anne, by the Grace of God, Queen of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.
Page 81 - Confederates, although the whole lading or any Part thereof should appertain to the Enemies of either, contraband Goods being always excepted.
Page 81 - It shall be lawful for all and singular the Subjects of the most Christian King and the Citizens People and Inhabitants of the said United States to sail with their Ships with all manner of Liberty...
Page 77 - ... it Be lawful, under any pretence, to take the faid books or writings forcibly out of the hands of the owners, or to retain them, the cafe of bankruptcy only excepted. Nor fhall the fubjects of the King- of Great Britain be...
Page 47 - It is agreed between his Majesty and the United States of America, that there shall be a reciprocal and entirely perfect liberty of navigation and commerce between their respective people, in the manner, under the limitations and on the conditions specified in the following articles : ARTICLE XII.
Page 89 - ... it may be known, whether any forbidden or contraband goods be on board the same ; which certificates shall be made out by the officers of the place whence the ship sailed , in the accustomed form...
Page 207 - Britain shall, in her own name, and that of her successors, be obliged, for ever hereafter, to admit the wines of the growth of Portugal into Britain...
Page 209 - But if at any time this deduction or abatement of customs, which is to be made as aforesaid, shall in any manner be attempted and prejudiced, it shall be just and lawful for his sacred royal majesty of Portugal, again to prohibit the woollen cloths, and the rest of the British woollen manufactures.

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