The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and Haymarket ...

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808 - English drama
 

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Page 42 - This is the place, the centre of the grove ; Here stands the oak, the monarch of the wood. How sweet and solemn is this midnight scene The silver moon, unclouded, holds her way Through skies, where I could count each little star. The fanning west wind scarcely stirs the leaves ; The river, rushing o'er its pebbled bed, Imposes silence, with a stilly sound. In such a place as this, at such an hour, If ancestry can be in aught believed, Descending spirits have conversed with man, And told the secrets...
Page 14 - Whom, with a troop of fifty chosen men, I met advancing. The pursuit I led, Till we o'ertook the spoil-encumber'd foe. We fought and conquer'd. E're a sword was drawn, An arrow from my bow had pierc'd their chief, Who wore that day the arms which now I wear.
Page 22 - At the dead hour of night was heard the cry Of one in jeopardy. I rose, and ran To where the circling eddy of a pool, Beneath the ford, us'd oft to bring within My reach whatever floating thing the stream Had caught.
Page 31 - Water his drink, his food the shepherd's alms. I went to see him, and my heart was touch'd With reverence and pity. Mild he spake, And, entering on discourse, such stories told AS made me oft revisit his sad cell. For he had been a soldier in his youth ; And fought in famous battles, when the peers Of Europe, by the bold Godfredo led, Against th' usurping Infidel displayed The blessed cross, and won the Holy Land.
Page 9 - Sincerity ! Thou first of virtues, let no mortal leave Thy onward path! although the earth should gape, And from the gulf of hell destruction cry To take dissimulation's winding way.
Page 35 - I'll kneel, And call Lord Douglas to protect his blood. Nor. The blood of Douglas will protect itself. Lady R. But we shall need both friend and favour, boy, To wrest thy lands and lordship from the gripe Of Randolph and his kinsman. Yet I think My tale will move each gentle heart to pity, My life incline the virtuous to believe.
Page 17 - On my sad heart, and kindled up a fondness For this young stranger wand'ring from his home, And like an orphan cast upon my care. I will protect thee, said I to myself, With all my power, and grace with all my favour.
Page 22 - Alas ! I'm sore beset ! let never man, For sake of lucre, sin against his soul! Eternal Justice is in this most just ! I, guiltless now, must former guilt reveal.
Page 25 - I did, one has no satisfaction with such apprehensions about one — if my lord should wake,or the Swish gentleman should see one, or madam Heidelberg should know of it, I should be frighted to death — besides I have had my tea already this morning I'm sure I hear my lord. [In a Fright.
Page 49 - But then, serius aut citius, as we say, sooner or later, Mr Sterling, he is sure to put his business out of hand as he should do. - My clerk has brought the writings and all other instruments along with him, and the settlement is, I believe, as good a settlement as any settlement on the face of the earth!

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