The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and Haymarket ...

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808 - English drama
 

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Page 54 - I'll have no glittering gewgaws stuck about you, To stretch the gaping eyes of idiot wonder, And make men stare upon a piece of earth As on the star-wrought firmament — no feathers To wave as streamers to your vanity — Nor cumbrous silk, that with its rustling sound Makes proud the flesh that bears it. She's adorn'd Amply, that in her husband's eye looks lovely — The truest mirror that an honest wife Can see her beauty in ! JUL.
Page 22 - twould grow again. — I think, to be an honest yeoman's wife (For such, my would-be duchess, you will find me,) You were cut out by nature.
Page 24 - To fret, and worry, and torment each other, And give a keener edge to our hard fate By sharp upbraidings, and perpetual jars ? — Or, like a loving and a patient pair...
Page 42 - I the first great man that has been made offhand by a tailor ? Show your grinders again, and I'll hang you like onions, fifty on a rope. I can't think what they see ridiculous about me, except, indeed, that I feel as if I was in armour, and my sword has a trick of getting between my legs, like a monkey's tail, as if it was determined to trip up my nobility.— And now, villains ! Don't let me see you tip the wink to each other, as I do the honours of my table.
Page 58 - I'll rattle thee to pieces in a dice-box, Or grind thee in a coffee-mill to powder, For thou must sup with Pluto : so, make ready ; Whilst I, with this good small-sword for a lancet, Let thy starved spirit out, (for blood thou hast none,) And nail thee to the wall, where thou shalt look Like a dried beetle, with a pin stuck through him.
Page 42 - I'll hang you like onions, fifty on a rope. I can't think what they see ridiculous about me, except, indeed, that I feel as if I was in armour, and my sword has a trick of getting between my legs, like a monkey's tail, as if it was determined to trip up my nobility. And now, villains ! don't let me see you tip the wink to each other, as I do the honours of my table. If I tell one of my best stories, don't any of you laugh before the jest comes out, to show that you have heard it before : take care...
Page 13 - But that stands still on Sundays ; Woman's tongue needs no reviving Sabbath. And, besides, A mill, to give it motion, waits for grist ; Now, whether she has aught to say or no, A woman's tongue will go for exercise. In short, I came to this conclusion : Most earthly things have their similitudes, But woman's tongue is yet incomparable.
Page 29 - Far too quickly, girl: Your shrewdness is a scare-crow to your beauty. Vol. It will fright none but fools, sir: men of sense must naturally admire in us the quality they most value in themselves ; a blockhead only protests against the wit of a woman, because he can't answer her drafts upon his understanding.
Page 60 - I have sworn an oath, That female flesh and blood should ne'er provoke me; — That is, in towns, or cities : I remember There was a special clause, — or should have been, — Touching a woman sleeping in a wood: For though, to the strict letter of the law, We bind our neighbours; yet, in our own cause, We give a liberal and large construction To its free spirit.
Page 63 - Now listen to my story. Handy Jun. You rivet my attention. Sir Philip. While we were boys, my father died intestate; so I, as elder born, became the sole possessor of his fortune; but the moment the law gave me power, I divided, in equal portions, his large possessions, one of which I with joy presented to my brother. Handy Jun. It was noble. Sir Philip. ( With suppressed agony. ) You shall hear, sir, how I was rewarded.

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