The Cambridge Dionysia: A Classic Dream

Front Cover
The author, 1858 - Lion - 16 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - ... their ale. And presently there came by a drunken Trinity sizar, who, after a successful trial, took the flagon, but when he had tasted, he cursed, and spit, and swore no Trinity shoe-black would condescend to drink it. Upon which a stout Johnian kicked his shins, and, as it was evident that trouble would ensue, and that we as men of the same College would be implicated in it, we hurried away, not wishing to desecrate the festival of the God by evil feelings. And on Magdalen-bridge was seated...
Page 13 - Comrades, when I heard your voices, how my heart within me leapt! Thoughts of happier days came o'er my spirit, and I almost wept : — Those bright days when free and happy with some kindred soul I strayed Talking of The Unconditioned up and down the chestnut glade. Now a cruel younger brother keeps me under lock and key. Those I hate are always by me. Those I love I may not see. O my own, my cherished Lion, offspring of my cares and toil, Would that I and thou were lying underneath the All Saints
Page 15 - Tis time for every lad of sense To arm in honesty's defence As if the French were steaming over In rams of iron from Brest to Dover. [BDELYLEON comes out leading PHILOLEON dressed in a First Trinity costume. Bdel.—Thank you, my brave allies ! And now to prove The confidence I have in your discretion I here entrust to you my elder brother, To watch his morals, and to cure his madness. So treat him kindly; put him in a tub, And...
Page 15 - ... the flank! You're too eager there, you youngsters: Jones and Prickard, keep your rank! Do not stay to spoil the fallen while a soul is left alive. We must smoke them out and kill them, now we've caught them in the hive. (They charge the writers in "The Lion,
Page 6 - And just inside the gateway of St. John's College there was a group of young men who successively tried to dance on an inflated pigskin. And he who danced best received a draught of their ale. And presently there came by a drunken Trinity sizar, who, after a successful trial, took the flagon, but when he had tasted, he cursed, and spit, and swore no Trinity shoe-black would condescend to drink it. Upon which a stout Johnian kicked his shins, and, as it was evident that trouble would ensue, and that...
Page 13 - ... Essay; ever prompt with a suggestion. Surely he must be offended At our leaving out his poem: Yet no insult was intended, As our want of space must show him. Or perchance he came home jolly, Wishing to knock down the porter, And lies cursing at his folly With a tongue that tastes like mortar. Show yourself upon the landing: Hear your loved companions' groans: For our feet are sore with standing On the rugged Old Court stones. [PHILOLEON shows himself at the window. Phil.—Comrades, when I heard...
Page 16 - With the head of a lion, and feet of a goose, and the ears of Robert Browning. But some of you good fellows think, as the poet grieves to hear, That you are laughed at in "the Bears," the play he wrote last year: So he assures you faithfully that no insult was intended.
Page 9 - Here's one as marvellous, and just as true. Methought I heard our Rhadamanthine Mayor Deal justice from the magisterial chair. A Corpus sizar had been well-nigh slain By fifteen blackguards in St. Botolph's lane. The Mayor approved his fellow-townsmen's pluck, And fined the plaintiff two-pound-ten for luck. As pensively he rubbed his broken head, " Confound old Currier Balls !" the gownsman said.t Gyp A.—Come now, I 'll chat a little with the audience.
Page 12 - O may the curses of the Gods light on you ! And may you wallow in the lowest Hades, Along with all the men who've struck their Tutor, Or laid against the boat-club of their College, Or caught a crab just opposite the Plough: In that sad place of punishment and...

Bibliographic information