The Canadian Annual Review of Public Affairs

Front Cover
Annual Review Publishing Company, 1915 - Canada
 

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Contents

THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN THE
91
Empire Unity in the War Imperial Policy and Action
97
The Dominion of New Zealand and the War
105
Position Problems and Policy of India in the War
113
Newfoundland in Peace and War During 1914
125
HI CANADA AND THE WORLDWAR
132
Canadian Opinion as to the European War and Canadas Policy
138
Preliminary Government Action War Session of Parliament
143
The Governments War Policy The Premiers Speeches
157
War Policy and Opinions of the Liberal Leaders and Party
164
Echoes of the Naval Debate Talk of a General Election
172
Canadian Military Action Recruiting the 1st and 2nd Contingents
178
Canadian Military Action The 1st Contingent at Valcartier
199
Canadian Military Action The 1st Contingent in England
205
Canadian Military Action Policy and Views of the Minister of Militia
211
Voluntary Contributions to War Funds Patriotic Organizations Bel
222
Financial Conditions and the War The Hon W T Whites policy
236
Canadian Industries and Trade Policy of the Minister of Trade and Com
247
Agriculture in Canada Increased Production Urged Policy of
263
Treatment of Enemy Aliens in Canada During the War
275
Canadian War Incidents Opinions Casualties and Personalities of 1914
286
Page
293
The United States Government and Problems of Neutrality
301
Internal American Conditions and Public Opinion
307
Belgium and Its Position during the War in 1914
321
Progress and Leading Events of the War during 1914
328
Brief Chronology of the War in 1914
341
British Empire Incidents of the War
348
PROVINCIAL AFFAIRSONTARIO
353
The Legislative Session Government Policy and Opposition Views
368
The Budget and Finances of 1914 The Workmans Compensation
386
The HydroElectric Commission Sir Adam Becks Work
395
The Department of Education University of Toronto and other Interests
404
The Bilingual Question in Ontario during 1914
419
The Provincial Elections Record of the Whitney Government
428
N W Rowells Manifesto to the Electors of OntarioJune 9th 1914
437
Result of the Elections Return of the Whitney Government
449
Government Changes in Ontario The New Hearst Cabinet
455
Ontario and the War Provincial Action and Policy
459
VIPROVINCIAL AFFAIRSQUEBEC
470
Government and Politics in New Brunswick during 1914
547
The Legislative Session The Grand Valley Railway
553
Education and General Development New Brunswick and the War
563
Page
572
Session of the Manitoba Legislature
579
The Provincial ElectionsLiberal Convention and Policy
589
Provincial ElectionsThe Temperance Issue
597
Manitoba and the War Special Session of the Legislature
608
Manitoba Incidents of 1914
616
War Problems of Saskatchewan Legislative Session
631
Agricultural Conditions Policy and Organization Cooperative Move
637
Prohibition and Education in Saskatchewan
643
PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS IN ALBERTA
650
The Legislature and the War Provincial Action and Conditions
659
Education in Alberta the Prohibition Movement
665
Alberta Development and the Oil Discoveries
671
Alberta Incidents and Miscellaneous Affairs
678
Session of the Legislature
692
Provincial Education British Columbia and the War
700
British Columbia Incidents of the Year
706
University and College Appointments of the Year
717
XIIITRANSPORTATION INTERESTS
727
P R Incidents of the Year
731
The Canadian Northern Railway System in 1914
737
The Borden Government during the Year
743
The First Parliamentary Session of 1914
751
Public Incidents and Interests
760
Incidents in Literature Journalism and Art
769
XVIIIEMPIRE AND UNITED STATES INCIDENTS
779
INDEX OF NAMES
788
INDEX OF AFFAIRS
800
PRESIDENTS OF AMATEUR ATHLETIC ASSOCIATIONS 761
5
ADDRESSES AND REPORTS OF THE BANK OF MONTREAL 8
8
ADDRESSES AND REPORTS OF THE CANADIAN BANK
14
ADDRESSES AND REPORTS OF THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 29
29
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUN LIFE OF CANADA 40
40
RECORD OF THE MONTREAL STAR IN 1914 47
47
THE CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION 53
53
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM 59
59
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Page 297 - Until a more complete code of the laws of war has been issued, the high contracting parties deem it expedient to declare that, in cases not included in the regulations adopted by them, the inhabitants and the belligerents remain under the protection and the rule of the principles of the law of nations, as they result from the usages established among civilized peoples, from the laws of humanity, and the dictates of the public conscience.
Page 398 - ... where total or partial incapacity for work results from the injury, a weekly payment during the incapacity after the second week not exceeding fifty per cent of his average weekly earnings during the previous twelve months, if he has been so long employed, but if not, then for any less period during which he has been in the employment of the same employer, such weekly payment not to exceed one pound.
Page 398 - ... in the case of partial incapacity the weekly payment shall in no case exceed the difference between the amount of the average weekly earnings of the workman before the accident and the average amount which he is earning or is able to earn in some suitable employment or business after the accident but shall amount to one-half of such difference.
Page 33 - In one way or another we must square our account with France if we wish for a free hand in our international policy. This is the first and foremost condition of a sound German policy, and since the hostility of France once for all cannot be removed by peaceful overtures, the matter must be settled by force of arms. France must be so completely crushed that she can never again come across our path.
Page 300 - Belligerents are forbidden to use neutral ports and waters as a base of naval operations against their adversaries, and in particular to erect wireless telegraphy stations or any apparatus for the purpose of communicating with the belligerent forces on land or sea.
Page 296 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4.
Page 299 - To lay unanchored automatic contact mines, except when they are so constructed as to become harmless one hour at most after the person who laid them ceases to control them; 2. To lay anchored automatic contact mines which do not become harmless as soon as they have broken loose from their moorings; 3.
Page 84 - The preservation of the common interests of all Powers in China by insuring the independence and integrity of the Chinese Empire and the principle of equal opportunities for the commerce and industry of all nations in China.
Page 296 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 303 - And I do hereby further declare and proclaim that any frequenting and use of the waters within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States by the armed vessels of...

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