The Canadian Law Times, Volume 34

Front Cover
Edward Douglas Armour, Edward Betley Brown, Charles Elliott, Edward Gillis, Augustus Henry Frazer Lefroy, Alfred Taylour Hunter, Bram Thompson
Carswell & Company, 1915 - Law
From 1900 to 1908 includes the "Annual digest of Canadian cases ... decided in the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, in the Supreme and Exchequer Courts of Canada, and in the courts of the provinces ... Edited by Edward B. Brown."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 563 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring; for ornament is in discourse; and for ability is in the judgment and disposition of business...
Page 59 - All subjects over which the sovereign power of a State extends, are objects of taxation; but those over which it does not extend, are, upon the soundest principles, exempt from taxation.
Page 1052 - ... or to forbid or restrain individual members of such organizations from lawfully carrying out the legitimate objects thereof...
Page 38 - The imposition of punishment by fine, penalty, or imprisonment for enforcing any law of the province made in relation to any matter coming within any of the classes of subjects enumerated in this section: 16.
Page 997 - To kill or wound treacherously individuals belonging to the hostile nation or army ; c. To kill or wound an enemy who, having laid down his arms, or having no longer means of defense, has surrendered at discretion ; d.
Page 1010 - An army of occupation can only take possession of cash, funds, and realizable securities which are strictly the property of the State, depots of arms, means of transport, stores and supplies, and, generally, all movable property belonging to the State which may be used for military operations.
Page 801 - Delay in making presentment for payment is excused when the delay is caused by circumstances beyond the control of the holder, and not imputable to his default, misconduct, or negligence. When the cause of delay ceases to operate, presentment must be made with reasonable diligence.
Page 563 - To spend too much time in studies, is sloth ; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humour of a scholar. They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need pruning by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience.
Page 40 - A constitution, to contain an accurate detail of all the subdivisions of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a legal code, and could scarcely be embraced by the human mind.
Page 908 - Heaven doth with us as we with torches do ; Not light them for themselves : for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not...

Bibliographic information