The Canadian Iron and Steel Industry: A Study in the Economic History of a Protected Industry

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1915 - Iron industry and trade - 376 pages
 

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Contents

CHAPTER II
20
The cost of mining
21
The character of the ore itself
23
Canadian resources in general
25
Favorable conditions of the Nova Scotia industry
27
The ores of New Brunswick and Newfoundland
29
Natural resources of Quebec
30
Ontarios vast deposits of iron ores
31
The coal problem
34
British Columbias iron ore and coal deposits
35
The impossibility of estimating Canadas resources
36
PART TWO The Iron Industry of Canada prior to the Adoption of the National Policy in 1879
39
CHAPTER III
41
First attempts in Ontario
49
The iron industry of the Maritime Provinces
55
The manufacture of finished products
59
A summary of progress
63
CHAPTER IV
64
The influence of iron ores
68
The supply of fuel
70
Transportation facilities
71
Labor and management
72
Lack of capital
73
The limited market
74
A summary and conclusion
77
PART THREE The Canadian Iron and Steel Industry
81
The tariff and bounties of 1894
88
Provincial and municipal largesse
89
Arguments for protection
90
The tariff and prices
91
to 1897
95
Specific versus ad valorem duties
96
The tariff and importation of iron and steel goods
97
Opposition to duties on pig iron bar iron and scrap iron
98
11 The bounty system its genesis and effects
102
A summary
104
CHAPTER V
105
CHAPTER VI
106
Success in Quebec
108
The growth of Scotia Ill 4 The revival in Ontario
114
Unsuccessful attempts
115
The rolling mill and finishing industry
120
The Tariff and Bounty System
124
Summary
127
CHAPTER VII
131
The Tariff Revision of 1897
132
The Bounty Act of 1897
139
The Tariff Revision of 1906
145
The Bounty Act of 1906
147
The Clergue rail contract
174
The steel rail duty
179
The dumping clause
182
The amount of protection granted
187
CHAPTER IX
190
A general statistical statement of progress
191
The Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company
194
The steel industry at Sydney the Dominion Iron and Steel Company
200
The Sault Ste Marie industries the Lake Superior Corpora tion
212
The Hamilton steel plant and allied interests the Steel Com pany of Canada
219
The Drummond interest the Canada Iron Corporation
222
The Canadian Steel Foundries at Welland and Montreal
227
MacKenzie and Mann interests the Atikokan Iron Company
228
The Deseronto charcoal furnace the Standard Iron Com pany
231
11 Ferroproducts and the electric steel industry
232
British Columbia operations and prospects
234
The United States Steel Corporation
235
14 Miscellaneous enterprises
236
A survey of progress
241
CHAPTER X
244
Combination of competing companies the Steel Company of Canada
249
Integrationof industry the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company
254
and Foundry Company and Canadian Steel Foundries
269
The United States Steel Corporation in Canada
271
Predictions and discussions
273
11 The character of the combination movement
275
Interlocking directorates
277
An estimate of the extent of the combination movement
281
Protection and combinations
284
CHAPTER XI
287
Favorable technical conditions
290
The Canadian market
293
Industrial organization
294
Other conditions
297
The position of the Canadian industry
298
The influence of protection
302
CHAPTER XII
308
Cheap iron and steel
311
A proposal
313
The end of the bounties
317
Protective inconsistencies
319
The plurality of interrelated causes
321
APPENDIX
323
A The statistical progress of Canada estimated population miles of railway in operation increase of railway mileage gross lia bilities of commercial fail...
325
The trend toward protection 2 The tariff and bounties from 1879 to 1887
326
84
328
Value of imports of steel rails wire rods bar iron
342
INDEX 307
360
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Page v - Schaffner, and Marx, of Chicago, who have shown a special interest in trying to draw the attention of American youth to the study of economic and commercial subjects...
Page 55 - It was not until the third decade of the nineteenth century that sugar and tobacco, Cuba's greatest products today, began to take front rank in the business of the island.
Page 182 - Customs or of any officer of customs authorized to collect customs duties, that the export price or the actual selling price to the Importer in Canada of any imported dutiable article, of a class or kind made or produced In Canada, is less than the fair market value thereof, as determined according to the basis of value for duty provided in the Customs Act in respect...
Page 183 - That such regulations may also provide for the exemption from special duty of any article when the difference between the fair market value and the selling price thereof to the importer as aforesaid amounts only to a small percentage of its fair market value.
Page i - The Canadian iron and steel industry. A study in the economic history of a protected industry.
Page 183 - Such regulations may provide for the temporary exemption from special duty of any article or class of articles, when it is established to the satisfaction of the Minister of Customs that such articles are not made or sold in Canada in substantial quantities and offered for sale to all purchasers on equal terms under like conditions, having regard to the custom and usage of trade.
Page 184 - In computing the difference for special-duty purposes between the "fair market value" in the country of export and the "selling price to the importer in Canada, " the fair market value of goods is to be estimated on the usual credit basis, except when the article is universally sold in the country of export for cash only, in which case the fair market value is to be estimated on a cash basis.
Page 184 - ... the fair market, value of goods for duty purposes. Examples. — (1) Hats sold for home consumption at $100 on credit, subject to 7 per cent cash discount, would be liable to special duty if sold to a purchaser in Canada on usual credit at $93, but would not be liable to special duty if sold to a purchaser in Canada for...
Page 143 - On rolled, round wire rods, not over three-eighths of an inch in diameter, when sold to wire manufacturers for use in making wire in their own factories in Canada, a bounty of...
Page 182 - ... Canada, is less than the fair market value thereof, as determined according to the basis of value for duty provided in the customs act in respect of imported goods subject to an ad valorem duty, such article shall, in addition to the duty otherwise established, be subject to a special duty of customs equal to the difference between such fair market value and such selling price...

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