The Canterbury Tales

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Infobase Publishing, 2008 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 118 pages
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The Canterbury Tales was the first great poem in the English language, and it remains a favorite among students and scholars to this day. Ideal for research, this new title in the Bloom's Guides series includes broad-ranging excerpts from interpretive essays that provide expert commentary on this timeless work. It also features an introduction by master scholar Harold Bloom, a bibliography, and an index.
 

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Contents

Introduction
7
Biographical Sketch
15
The Story Behind the Story
19
List of Characters
23
Summary and Analysis
34
Critical Views
68
Works by Geoffrey Chaucer
101
Annotated Bibliography
102
Contributors
109
Acknowledgments
112
Index
115
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University. He is the author of 30 books, including Shelley's Mythmaking (1959), The Visionary Company (1961), Blake's Apocalypse (1963), Yeats (1970), A Map of Misreading (1975), Kabbalah and Criticism (1975), Agon: Toward a Theory of Revisionism (1982), The American Religion (1992), The Western Canon (1994), and Omens of Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection (1996). The Anxiety of Influence (1973) sets forth Professor Bloom's provocative theory of the literary relationships between the great writers and their predecessors. His most recent books include Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), a 1998 National Book Award finalist, How to Read and Why (2000), Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds (2002), Hamlet: Poem Unlimited (2003), Where Shall Wisdom be Found (2004), and Jesus and Yahweh: The Names Divine (2005). In 1999, Professor Bloom received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Criticism. He has also received the International Prize of Catalonia, the Alfonso Reyes Prize of Mexico, and the Hans Christian Andersen Bicentennial Prize of Denmark.

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