The Capers Papers

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Univ. Press of Mississippi, 1992 - Literary Collections - 124 pages
"When we read the collection here we want still more." -Eudora Welty A pleasure jaunt through the irrepressibly funny world of a gifted raconteur All who know Charlotte Capers treasure her wit and her charismatic storytelling. Here a selection of her amusing narratives moves from conversation to the page as she takes the ordinary and makes it refreshing and fascinating. Clever, sophisticated, and entertaining, she ranges over many subjects-dogs, tenants, travels, an operation, babies, a car wreck, and small-town life at its ordinary gait. Those who read these witty essays written by a fabulous raconteur will feel included in a close and special circle. Charlotte Capers, former director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, lives in Jackson, Mississippi.
 

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Contents

Foreword
9
Authors Note
12
God and My Grandmother
13
God and My Grandmother
15
Pass the Pesticide Pappy
29
Pass the Pesticide Pappy
31
Ivy League
34
My Dog Holly
36
There Go the Joneses
70
Apartment for Rent
73
Apartment for Rent
75
The Tiny Tenant
80
By the Dawns Early Light
81
How to Get a Baby
83
The Little Wrecker
84
La Mere Goose
86

Moving Day
42
Wreck
44
Not Speaking of Operations
48
The Pain of It All
53
The Pain of It All
55
Be It Ever So
58
Queen of the May
62
Tell Me About Your Trip
64
Good Sport
66
Planning to Build?
68
Out of the Nowhere
88
Summer is for Children
91
Fasten Your Seat Belts
95
What la Peste?
97
Fasten Your Seat Belts
98
Westward the Women
107
Pawleys Island
110
Allisons Wells
117
Autumn Light
120
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Eudora Welty was born in Jackson, Mississippi on April 13, 1909. She was educated at the Mississippi State College for Women in Columbus, Mississippi, and at the University of Wisconsin. She moved to New York in 1930 to study advertising at the Columbia University business school. After her father's death, she moved back to Jackson in 1931. She held various jobs on local newspapers and at a radio station before becoming a publicity agent for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), part of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal program. Travelling through the state of Mississippi opened her eyes to the misery of the great depression and resulted in a series of photographs, which were exhibited in a one-women show in New York in 1936 and were eventually published as One Time, One Place: Mississippi in the Depression in 1971. She stopped working for the WPA in 1936. Her first stories, Magic and Death of a Travelling Salesman, were published in small magazines in 1936. Some of her better-known short stories are Why I Live at the P.O., Petrified Man, and A Worn Path. Her short story collections include A Curtain of Green, The Golden Apples, The Wide Net and Other Stories, and The Bride of Innisfallen and Other Stories. Her first novel, The Robber Bridegroom, was published in 1942. Her other novels include Delta Wedding, The Ponder Heart, Losing Battles, and The Optimist's Daughter, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972. She received the gold medal for fiction from the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1972. Her nonfiction works include A Snapshot Album, The Eye of the Storm: Selected Essays and Reviews, and One Writer's Beginnings. She died from complications following pneumonia on July 23, 2001 at the age of 92.

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