The Case of Jennie Brice

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Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1915 - Detective and mystery stories - 227 pages
 

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Loved it!
I am a fan of Mary Roberts Rhinehart, and this is one of her best! Her mature lady characters are always the most appealing for me, possibly because I am a mature lady. She adds some
romance into her mystery stories, but not enough to cloud the plot. It was a singular glimpse into the times, with all of the details nonchalantly written to enrich the characters and setting. I read it in an afternoon. It was easy to read, and the final plot twist is a little thin, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. 

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Page 12 - Do you know what I was doing when you came in? I was looking after his boat, and hoping it had a hole in it." "You won't feel that way tomorrow, Mrs. Ladley," I protested, shocked. "You're just nervous and put out. Most men have their ugly times. Many a time I wished Mr. Pitman was gone — until he went. Then I'd have given a good bit to have him back again.
Page 14 - I had made into a temporary kitchen, with a candle, and with a bedquilt around my shoulders. The water rose fast in the lower hall, but by midnight, at the seventh step, it stopped rising and stood still. I always have a skiff during the flood season, and as the water rose, I tied it to one spindle of the staircase after another. I made myself a cup of tea, and at one p'clock I stretched out on a sofa for a few hours
Page 134 - He stood there, tapping the palm of one hand with the forefinger of the other. He was dirty and unshaven. His clothes looked as if he had been sleeping in them. "So they've got him!
Page 11 - I hope you are not going away. These floods don't last, and they're a benefit. Plenty of the people around here rely on 'em every year to wash out their cellars." "No, I'm not going away," she replied lazily. "I'm taking that dress to Miss Hope at the theater. She is going to wear it in Charlie's Aunt next week. She hasn't half enough of a wardrobe to play leads in stock. Look at this thumb-nail, broken to the quick!
Page 19 - He closed and locked the door behind him, and although Peter whined and scratched, he did not let him in. He looked so agitated that I thought I had been harsh, and that perhaps she was really ill. I knocked at the door, and asked if I could do anything. But he only called "No" curtly through the door, and asked me to take that infernal dog away.
Page 23 - I did. He shut the door in my face, and it caught poor Peter by the nose. The dog ran off howling, but although Mr. Ladley had been as fond of the animal as it was in his nature to be fond of anything, he paid no attention. As I started down the hall after him, I saw what Peter had been carrying — a slipper of Mrs.
Page 9 - Sunday, he was in his slippers and had the colored supplement of a morning paper in his hand. "What's the matter with the Ladleys?" he asked. "I can't read for their quarreling." "Booze, probably," I said. "When you've lived in the flood district as long as I have, Mr. Reynolds, you'll know that the rising of the river is a signal for every man in the vicinity to stop work and get full. The fuller the river, the fuller the male population.
Page 23 - ... face, and it caught poor Peter by the nose. The dog ran off howling, but although Mr. Ladley had been as fond of the animal as it was in his nature to be fond of anything, he paid no attention. As I started down the hall after him, I saw what Peter had been carrying — a slipper of Mrs. Ladley's.
Page 5 - It's up to the swinging-shelf in the cellar now. I'd like to take up the carpet and move the piano." "Come back in an hour or so," he snapped, and tried to close the door. But I had got my toe in the crack. "I'll have to have the piano moved, Mr. Ladley,
Page 28 - ... on a shelf in the room where I had slept the night before, and now Peter brought it out of the flood where its wooden handle had kept it afloat. The blade was broken off short. It is not unusual to find one's household goods floating around during flood-time. More than once I've lost a chair...

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