The Casual Sky Observer's Guide: Stargazing with Binoculars and Small Telescopes

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 12, 2011 - Science - 292 pages

The Casual Sky Observer's Pocket Guide offers an observing program for occasional amateur observers looking for some quick, fun astronomy adventures under the stars. In the real world, where time for observing is limited, the weather is seldom perfect, and expensive equipment is not an option, amateur astronomy may not be seen as a worthwhile activity. However, portable and quick-to-set-up instruments are available. A pair of binoculars or a small telescope fills the bill. And the way to make the most of these instruments is described in the Casual Sky Observer's Pocket Guide.

Not only does the book feature the best and brightest showpieces of the heavens; it also provides a great deal of physical and environmental data as well as lots of fascinating information and beautiful illustrations that provide a unique perspective on the many treasures within and beyond our home galaxy, the Milky Way--stars, star clusters, other galaxies, and nebulae, all within reach of binoculars or a small telescope.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Navigating the Sea of Stars
1
Welcome to the Milky Way
59
January
79
February
99
March
117
April
133
May
149
June
163
August
197
September
211
October
227
November
241
December
259
Taking It Further
275
Glossary
279
Index
287

July
181

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Rony De Laet, a Belgian national who holds a Master of Science degree in Industrial Science (Chemistry), has been an enthusiastic amateur astronomer since his teens. He has had articles published (in Dutch) in the monthly Flemish VVS Astronomical Magazine, and his special talent is in producing photo-real computer drawings of the night sky. His work was on exhibition at the International Astronomical Sketching Exhibition, called "In the Footsteps of Galileo," at the Blackrock Castle Observatory in Ireland (from February until May 2009) and then later at Birr Castle, the historic site of Ross's 1845 72-inch telescope (now restored and open for visitors).

Bibliographic information