The Casualty Gap: The Causes and Consequences of American Wartime Inequalities

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Oxford University Press, Apr 28, 2010 - Political Science - 320 pages
The Casualty Gap shows how the most important cost of American military campaigns--the loss of human life--has been paid disproportionately by poorer and less-educated communities since the 1950s. Drawing on a rich array of evidence, including National Archives data on the hometowns of more than 400,000 American soldiers killed in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq, this book is the most ambitious inquiry to date into the distribution of American wartime casualties across the nation, the forces causing such inequalities to emerge, and their consequences for politics and democratic governance.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 The Casualty Gap
3
Chapter 2 Inequality and US Casualties from WWII to Iraq
14
Chapter 3 Selection Occupational Assignment and the Emergence of the Casualty Gap
56
Chapter 4 Do Casualty Gaps Matter?
92
Chapter 5 How Local Casualties Shape Politics
109
Chapter 6 Political Ramifications of the Vietnam Casualty Gap
131
Chapter 7 Political Ramifications of the Iraq Casualty Gap
161
Chapter 8 The Casualty Gap and Civic Engagement
191
Chapter 9 The Future of the Casualty Gap
226
Notes
235
References
277
Index
295
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About the author (2010)

Douglas L. Kriner is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston University. Francis X. Shen is Fellow, MacArthur Foundation Law & Neuroscience Project.

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