The Cerrados of Brazil: Ecology and Natural History of a Neotropical Savanna

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 2002 - History - 398 pages

While the imperiled Brazilian rainforest has been the focus of considerable international media attention and conservation efforts, the massive grasslands of Brazil -- known as the cerrados -- which cover roughly a quarter of its land surface and are among the most threatened regions in South America, have received little notice. This book brings together leading researchers on the area to produce the first detailed account in English of the natural history and ecology of the cerrado/savanna ecosystem. Given their extent and threatened status, the richness of their flora and fauna, and the lack of familiarity with their unique ecology at the international level, the cerrados are badly in need of this important and timely work.

 

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Contents

Relation of Soils and Geomorphic Surfaces in
13
Late Quaternary History and Evolution of the Cerrados
33
The Fire Factor
51
Past and Current Human Occupation and Land Use
69
II
89
Herbaceous Plant Communities
121
Patterns and Dynamics of Plant Populations
140
The Role of Fire in Population Dynamics of Woody Plants
159
The Character and Dynamics of the Cerrado Herpetofauna
223
Diversity Ecology and Natural
266
on the Behavioral Ecology of Insect Herbivores
287
Unique or Typical?
306
Plant Communities
329
V
345
Biodiversity and Conservation Priorities in
351
Contributors
369

Ecophysiology of Woody Plants
178
Lepidoptera in the Cerrado Landscape and the Conservation
201

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About the author (2002)

Paulo S. Oliveira is professor of ecology at the Universidade Estadual de Campinas in Brazil and was president of the Association for Tropical Biology in 1999. Robert J. Marquis is associate professor of biology at the University of Missouri in St. Louis and is currently editor of Biotropica, the journal of the Association for Tropical Biology.

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