The Challenge of Political Islam: Non-Muslims and the Egyptian State

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Stanford University Press, Apr 23, 2010 - Religion - 277 pages
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The rise of political Islam has provoked considerable debate about the compatibility of democracy, tolerance, and pluralism with the Islamist position. As The Challenge of Political Islam reveals, Egyptian Islamists today are more integrated into the political arena than ever, and are voicing a broad spectrum of positions, including a vision of Islamic citizenship more inclusive of non-Muslims.

Based on Islamist writings, political tracts, and interviews with Islamists including members of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood and other important contemporary thinkers this book looks closely at how modern, politically-oriented Egyptian Islamists perceive non-Muslims in an Islamic state and how non-Muslims respond. Clarifying the movement's aims, this work uncovers how Islamists have responded to the pressures of modernity, the degree to which the movement has been influenced by both a historical Islamic framework and Western modes of political thinking, and the necessity to reconsider the notion that secularism is a precondition for toleration.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 NonMuslims in Classical Islam
12
2 Continuity Discontinuity and the Rise of Islamism
34
3 NonMuslims and the Egyptian State
64
4 The Dhimma
92
5 Toward Citizenship
122
6 Citizenship in an Islamic State
147
7 Coptic Responses
166
Conclusion
190
Notes
197
Bibliography
245
Index
267
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About the author (2010)

Rachel Scott is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies in the Department of Religion and Culture at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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