The Champlain Valley Book of Recipes

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A.M. Warren, 1880 - Cooking - 185 pages
 

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Page 89 - ... pound them to a paste, mixing the rose-water gradually with them ; powder the sugar, and beat the yolks till very light ; mix the milk and cream together, and stir in gradually, the sugar, the pounded almonds, and the beaten yolks. Stir the whole very hard. Put the mixture into a skillet or sauce pan, and set it in a heated stove, or on a charcoal furnace. Stir it one way till it becomes thick, but take it off before it curdles. Set it away to get cold. Take half the whites of the eggs ; beat...
Page 59 - Six ounces of currants from the stems you must sort, Lest you break out your teeth, and spoil all the sport. Six ounces of sugar won't make it too sweet ; Some salt, and some nutmeg, will make it complete. Three hours let it boil, without any flutter ; But Adam won't like it without wine and butter.
Page 88 - Put it in deep platei lined with pie crust, with a thick layer of sugar to each layer of rhubarb. A little grated lemon peel may be added. Place over the top a thick crust; press it tight round the edge of the plate, and perforate it with a fork, that the crust may not burst while baking, and let the juices of the pie escape. Bake about one hour in a slow oven. Rhubarb pie must not be quick baked. Some stew rhubarb before making it into pies, but it is best without stewing.
Page 17 - TO BROIL A SHAD. Split and wash the shad, and afterwards dry it in a cloth. Season it with salt and pepper. Have ready a bed of clear bright coals. Grease your gridiron well, and as soon as it is hot lay the shad upon it, and broil it for about a. quarter of an hour or more, according to the thickness. Butter it well, and send it to table. You may serve with it melted butter in a sauceboat.
Page 39 - It is very good boiled, then stewed a few minutes in milk, with a little butter and salt. Another way which is very good, is to make a batter of wheat flour, milk and eggs ; cut the Salsify in thin slices, (after...
Page 89 - Put the mixture inLo a skillet or sauce-pan, and set it in a heated stove, or on a charcoal furnace. Stir it one way till it becomes thick, but take it off the fire before it has been long enough to curdle. Set it away to get cold. Take half the whites of the eggs, and beat them to a stiff froth, adding a little powdered sugar, and a few drops of oil of lemon (the latter in proportion to its strength.) Put the custard into a glass...
Page 142 - Two chickens, chopped coarse ; eight heads of celery, three eggs, one pint vinegar, one tablespoon flour, one tablespoon sugar, rub the yolks of the eggs to a fine powder, then add the salt, mustard and oil, mixing well together; then add the cream; and after that the vinegar and raw egg. CHICKEN SALAD. Mrs. Hobbs. Three chickens chopped fine, both light and dark meat; the juice of two lemons; eight or ten eggs boiled hard; the whites chopped fine and the yolks mashed fine, moisten with six teaspoons...
Page 61 - ... for the top a trifle thicker and lay it on heavily. When it has stiffened somewhat, stick the shred almonds closely over it. Set in the oven to harden, but do not let it scorch. COFFEE CAKE. One cup of brown sugar, one cup of butter, two eggs, one-half cup of molasses, one cup of strong, cold coffee, one teaspoonful of soda, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, one cup of raisins or currants and five cups of sifted flour. Add the fruit last, rubbed in a little of the flour....
Page 59 - EVE'S PUDDING. If you want a good pudding, mind what you are taught. Take of eggs six in number, when bought for a groat ; The fruit with which Eve her husband did cozen, Well pared and well chopped, at least half a dozen ; Six ounces of bread ; let Moll eat the crust...

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