The Changing Family: International Perspectives on the Family and Family Law

Front Cover
Ronald Thandabantu Nhlapo, John Eekelaar
Hart Publishing, 1998 - Law - 634 pages
Increasing recognition of different family structures has posed dilemmas for family law and policy throughout the world. The problem often takes the form of conflicts between constitutional law or international human rights norms and between traditional forms of family association and emerging new forms of familial living. In this volume,leading family lawyers chart and analyse how family law in countries with a wide variety of different backgrounds has responded to these problems. Divided into six parts, the book examines the social and demographic context, the dynamics of legal assimilation of changes in social norms, the State and pluralism, the constitutionalisation of family law, social and natural parenthood and the reconciliation of changing norms and changing family forms. In doing this it provides many insights into the differences and similarities between developments in western and non-western countries and the ways in which all systems seek to reconcile official law and ideology with social behaviour.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PART ONETHE CHANGING FACE OF FAMILY LAW IN
1
Issues
33
The New Codification of Russian Family Law
73
Copyright

36 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

John Eekelaar is Reader in law and Fellow of Pembroke College,Oxford.

Bibliographic information