The Chase for Beauty

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Morgan James Publishing, Jan 1, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 220 pages
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Dr. Dennis Hurwitz's chase for beauty hasn't merely been in the operating room. It has been in the plastic surgeon's own backyard. As a father, he was confronted with unimaginable ugliness when, on October 27, 1989, he stepped out his backdoor and into what is every loving parent's most horrific nightmare. Heroically, he somehow found beauty again. But a decade later, after he tried to achieve one of his miraculous surgical outcomes for a young deformed patient, he was drawn into another abyss of ugliness. The "Chase for Beauty" is about much more than Dennis Hurwitz, the plastic surgeon. It's about a man who never gave up his personal or professional chase for beauty in a world that could be so ugly.

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About the author (2008)

To tell Dr. Hurwitz's gripping saga, Robert Mendelson relied on the experience he accumulated in his 28-year writing career as an award-winning author (A Family Divided), journalist, and editor. An English major at Franklin and Marshall College (Lancaster, Pa.), Mr. Mendelson's interest in nonfiction was nurtured during his years as a reporter for several newspapers, including the Chicago Sun-Times. His four-year tenure as editor in chief of the University of Pittsburgh's Pitt Magazine helped him glean his narrative-nonfiction style, which also catapulted the publication toward editorial excellence. When he took over the magazine in 2001, the publication held seven editorial awards in regional, national, and international competitions. When he resigned in late spring 2005 to write The Chase for Beauty, the magazine held 19 awards. One year later, the magazine held nine awards. Before bringing Dr. Hurwitz's authorized story to life, Mr. Mendelson conducted nearly 100 interviews. They were digitally recorded to ensure accuracy. (Most interviews resulted in a 20-30 page transcript.) Mr. Mendelson had complete creative control over the manuscript. Since finishing the book at the end of 2006, Mr. Mendelson has become executive editor of Carnegie Mellon Today, the quarterly publication for the acclaimed Pennsylvania-based university.

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