The Chemical Gazette, Or, Journal of Practical Chemistry, in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts, and Manufactures, Volume 3

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William Francis, Henry Croft
R. and J.E. Taylor, 1845 - Chemistry
 

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Page 336 - This communication was intended to explain the methods by which the author has succeeded in throwing down metallic alloys from compound solutions by the action of galvanic electricity. The process adopted, is to prepare a strong solution of cyanide of potassium, and commence electrolyzing it, by means of a copper anode; as soon as copper begins to be dissolved, the copper anode is removed, and its place supplied with one of zinc; after the action has continued for some little time, brass will be...
Page 83 - Fahr. is 1-168; it boils at 323 Fahr., and distils at that temperature without alteration. It dissolves to a large extent in cold water and also in alcohol. Its solution in concentrated sulphuric acid has a magnificent purple colour, and is decomposed by water. Nitric acid, with the aid of...
Page 334 - The velocity of air being !•, the velocity of oxygen was found to be -9500 by experiment, and by calculation -9487. Carbonic acid, being much heavier than air, gave the number -812. Carburetted hydrogen gave -1322 as the velocity of its effusion. Hydrogen gave as the velocity of effusion 3-613 by experiment, which was very nearly the amount given by theory. The interference of friction, even of minute orifices, was then described, and shown to admit of easy correction. Some useful applications...
Page 51 - ... becomes clear, it is decanted. It contains rutheniate, chromate and silicate of potash. Nitric acid is added cautiously, until the alkaline re-action has disappeared ; by this means, oxide of Ruthenium and potash, and some silicic acid, are precipitated, as a velvet black powder; after washing this powder, it is dissolved in muriatic acid, evaporated until the silica separates as a gelatinous mass; it is then diluted with water, and filtered. It must not be evaporated to dryness for the more...
Page 56 - Thilorier-s bath of solid carbonic acid and aether, placing it however under the recipient of an air-pump. By maintaining a constant vacuum, I lowered the temperature to such a degree, that the carbonic acid of the bath was not more volatile than water at the temperature of 86, for the barometer of the air-pump stood at 28*2 inches, the external barometer being at 29-4. This arrangement made, I joined together, by means of corks and stop-cocks, some small glass and copper tubes, so that with the...
Page 307 - The author was first led to undertake the researches of which an account is given in the present memoir, by the expectation of verifying the theory of DeCandolle, in which the deterioration experienced by most crops on their repetition was attributed to the deleterious influence of their root-excretions.
Page 265 - ... of clear water, and mix them intimately by agitating the vessel after corking it. The red precipitate of purple of Cassius which forms is washed and dried with care. A peculiar glass is then prepared by mixing together 40 parts of very pure quartz pulverized, 16 parts of nitre, 8 parts of borax, 1 part of white arsenic, 1 part of cream of tartar, finely pulverized and sifted through silk, and a greater or lesser quantity of the purple of Cassius, according as you want a more or less deep colour.
Page 290 - Iron pots, and especially those of enamelled cast-iron, are very extensively used in domestic economy. To enamel these vessels they are cleaned as perfectly as possible with weak sulphuric acid, then washed with cold water, and dipped into a thin paste, made with quartz first melted with borax, feldspar, and clay free from iron, reduced to an impalpable powder, and sufficient water to form a rather thin paste.
Page 175 - Magnesia, or magnesian limestone, may be substituted for lime, or its carbonate, in this process. When the carbonate of lime is used with rather too low a heat in the furnace, carbonate of manganese may be formed. In all cases the resulting mixture of chloride of calcium or magnesium, and oxide of manganese, is to be treated with water, so as to dissolve out the said chlorides, and leave the oxide of manganese. The following is the mode of decomposing sulphate of manganese, however formed, so as...
Page 336 - Many specimens were exhibited of copper and other metals coated with brass. The author makes some remarks on the theory of the action; and concludes by stating that it will be quite possible to determine, within certain limits, the character of the alloy that shall present itself, and that we may be enabled to throw...

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