The Cherry Tree

Front Cover
Knopf, 1992 - Japan - 32 pages
After a war destroys their Japanese village and kills their father, Taichi and Yumiko find hope by nursing a cherry tree through a harsh winter and seeing it blossom into new life.

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User Review  - mariasegoviano - LibraryThing

After losing their father and home during the war and while their mother is busy during the day, struggling to earn a living. A young boy and his sister try to help and old man wrap a damaged cherry ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LauraMcQueen - LibraryThing

The Cherry Tree was a good story. It is about a village, family, and tree that all have to rebuild after the war. I think this would be a great story to share with students about never giving up hope ... Read full review

About the author (1992)

Daisaku Ikeda was born in Tokyo, Japan on January 2, 1928 into a family of seaweed farmers. Ikeda is a prolific writer, environmentalist, peace activist, and follower of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, also considered "true Buddhism". He has written over 100 books on Buddhism. Ikeda was the president of Soka Gakkai, an organization supporting the practice of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, from 1960 to 1979 and currently maintains the position of Soka Gakkai Honorary President. Ikeda developed SGI (Soka Gakkai International) which is an international outreach program for Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism. Many members of this organization refer to him as their "mentor in life". Ikeda has been influential world-wide. He holds over 230 honorary doctorates and over 550 honorary citizenships around the world. Ikeda also holds numerous memberships and has received many awards. Ikeda has founded many educational, peace and cultural institutions including Soka University (1971), Tokyo Fuji Art Museum (1983), and Toda Institute for Global Peace and Policy Research (1996). Ikeda and his wife, Kaneko, married on May 3, 1952. They have three sons.

Geraldine McCaughrean was born in Enfield, England on June 6, 1951. She was educated at Christ Church College, Canterbury. She has written more than 160 books and plays for children and adults. Her writing career includes the retelling of such classics as One Thousand and One Arabian Nights, The Canterbury Tales, and The Bronze Cauldron: Myths and Legends of the World, which is a collection of stories from all over the world. She has received numerous awards including three Whitbread Children's Book Awards for A Little Lower Than the Angels, Gold Dust, and Not the End of the World. She also received the Guardian Prize and Carnegie Medal for A Pack of Lies, the Beefeater Children's Novel Award for Gold Dawn, the Michael L. Printz Award for The White Darkness, and the 2018 Carnegie Medal for children's and YA books for her middle-grade novel Where the World Ends.

Brian Wildsmith was born on January 22, 1930. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, London for three years. He later taught maths at the Royal Military School of Music but left so that he could pursue painting. He began working with Oxford University Press in the late 1950s when he was commissioned to illustrate 12 color plates for Tales from the Arabian Nights. He wrote and illustrated more than 80 books during his lifetime including A Christmas Story, Cat on the Mat, and ABC, which won the Kate Greenaway Medal. He died on August 31, 2016 at the age of 86.

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