The Citadel of Cairo: A New Interpretation of Royal Mameluk Architecture

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BRILL, 1995 - Social Science - 339 pages
This architectural history of the Citadel of Cairo uses indices from maps, photographs, plans of hitherto unstudied structures, and a large array of historical documents to chronologically reconstruct the Citadel's development from its foundation by Salah al-Din until it reached its most monumental form in the middle of the fourteenth century.
The study analyzes the influence of Mamluk socio-political hierarchy on the conceptualization of the Citadel's spaces and forms; assesses its impact on medieval Cairo; proposes a new interpretation for the development of Mamluk royal architecture; and presents new definitions for a number of medieval architectural terms.
By weaving the history of the Citadel together with the history of Cairo and the Mamluk system, this book is relevant to historians of architecture and urbanism and medieval historians.
 

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Contents

Whence the Citadel
1
The Citadel Today
18
The Ayyubid Sultanate Acquires a New Center
50
The Early Mamluk Period
90
The Citadel under Qalawun and alAshraf Khalil
132
The Citadel and the Mamluk System
283
Glossary
297
Bibliography
311
Index
327
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About the author (1995)

Nasser O. Rabbat, Ph.D. (1991) in Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is Associate Professor of the History of Architecture at MIT. He has published extensively on early and medieval Islamic architecture, institutions, and urbanism. His dissertation, upon which this book is based, received the 1991 Malcolm H. Kerr Dissertation Award.

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