The Civil Law and the Church

Front Cover
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2005 - Law - 951 pages
Lincoln, Charles Z. The Civil Law and the Church. New York: The Abington Press, [1916]. lii, 951 pp. Reprint available January, 2005 by the Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-474-6. Cloth. $165. * A powerful resource for students of church-state relations, this book is a detailed compilation of principal judicial decisions rendered by the courts of Great Britain, Canada, and the United States that deal with questions relating to religious matters, religious societies, and civil matters with religious aspects. Arranged by confession and topic, it includes such chapters as "Arbitration," "Bible," "Civil Courts," "Deacons," "Jews," "Presbyterian Church," "Salvation Army," "Sunday" and "Unitarians." With a table of cases and a thorough index.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
21
III
22
IV
23
V
24
VI
25
VII
30
VIII
41
LXIX
372
LXX
403
LXXI
406
LXXII
416
LXXIII
421
LXXIV
422
LXXV
424
LXXVI
425

IX
47
X
49
XI
51
XII
54
XIII
58
XIV
67
XV
68
XVI
83
XVII
92
XVIII
97
XIX
103
XX
106
XXI
119
XXII
120
XXIII
124
XXIV
126
XXV
127
XXVI
167
XXVII
176
XXVIII
177
XXIX
179
XXX
187
XXXI
189
XXXII
190
XXXIII
196
XXXIV
197
XXXV
198
XXXVI
199
XXXVII
200
XXXVIII
215
XXXIX
216
XL
217
XLI
219
XLII
221
XLIII
232
XLIV
233
XLV
241
XLVI
249
XLVII
250
XLVIII
252
XLIX
255
L
268
LI
269
LII
271
LIII
273
LIV
276
LV
277
LVI
278
LVII
280
LVIII
283
LIX
293
LX
295
LXI
297
LXII
308
LXIII
313
LXIV
314
LXV
317
LXVI
329
LXVII
333
LXVIII
359
LXXVII
429
LXXVIII
430
LXXIX
431
LXXX
433
LXXXI
441
LXXXII
444
LXXXIII
445
LXXXIV
446
LXXXV
467
LXXXVI
470
LXXXVII
480
LXXXVIII
515
LXXXIX
516
XC
519
XCI
545
XCII
548
XCIII
574
XCIV
575
XCV
578
XCVI
587
XCVII
589
XCVIII
597
XCIX
598
C
617
CI
618
CII
626
CIII
627
CIV
628
CV
647
CVI
657
CVII
690
CVIII
693
CIX
694
CX
695
CXI
708
CXII
710
CXIII
719
CXIV
727
CXV
728
CXVI
729
CXVII
731
CXVIII
743
CXIX
789
CXX
792
CXXI
793
CXXII
805
CXXIII
824
CXXIV
844
CXXV
847
CXXVI
852
CXXVII
864
CXXVIII
865
CXXIX
868
CXXX
874
CXXXI
876
CXXXII
894
CXXXIII
895
CXXXIV
905
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Page 84 - A charity, in the legal sense, may be more fully defined as a gift, to be applied consistently with existing laws, for the benefit of an indefinite number of persons, either by bringing their minds or hearts under the influence of education or religion, by relieving their bodies from disease, suffering, or constraint, by assisting them to establish themselves in life, or by erecting or maintaining public buildings or works, or otherwise lessening the burdens of government.
Page 618 - In this country the full and free right to entertain any religious belief, to practice any religious principle, and to teach any religious doctrine which does not violate the laws of morality and property, and which does not infringe personal rights, is conceded to all. The law knows no heresy, and is committed to the support of no dogma, the establishment of no sect.
Page 589 - religion" has reference to one's views of his relations to his Creator, and to the obligations they impose of reverence for his being and character, and of obedience to his will.
Page 589 - With man's relations to his Maker and the obligations he may think they impose, and the manner in which an expression shall be made by him of his belief on those subjects, no interference can be permitted, provided always the laws of society, designed to secure its peace and prosperity, and the morals of its people, are not interfered with.
Page 100 - Christianity, general Christianity, is, and always has been, a part of the common law of Pennsylvania; ... not Christianity with an established church, and tithes, and spiritual courts; but Christianity with liberty of conscience to all men.
Page 516 - The third is where the religious congregation or ecclesiastical body holding the property is but a subordinate member of some general church organization in which there are superior ecclesiastical tribunals with a general and ultimate power of control more or less complete, in some supreme judi.catory over the whole membership of that general organization.

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