The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's

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Priv. print. by the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1915 - Connecticut infantry. 18th regiment, 1862-1865 - 159 pages
 

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Contents

I
5
II
13
III
34
IV
138

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Page 73 - NH, 1982), 91. on. We feel that the South brought on the war and the State of Virginia is paying dear for her part."5Short of ammunition because none could get through.
Page 39 - I well knew you would attempt anything for your general. Boys, I watched you with pride as you charged the third time ; but when I saw your ranks withering, and your comrades falling, it made my heart grow sad within me, and I ordered you to fall back. You know the rest. You were surrounded, and there was no escape. But I miss your noble commander, Col. Ely ; may he soon return to you ! Boys...
Page 38 - ... foe. Again I saw you the next morning, facing as hot a fire as I ever witnessed. I looked in vain to see you waver. Boys, it was a hot place, — a hot place. I saw you go where none but brave men dare to go; saw you make three successful charges, preserving your line as well as if on dress-parade. I witnessed it all. I saw you as you broke the first line of Rebel infantry, and charged up to their batteries ; driving away their gunners, still pressing on, and breaking their reserves. But a third...
Page 38 - I saw you in the second days' fight as you charged the enemy from your rifle-pits and drove them back upon their reserves, holding them in check until night ; when you fell back, but with your face to the foe. Again I saw you the next morning, facing as hot a fire as I ever witnessed. I looked in vain to see you waver. Boys, it was a hot place, — a hot place. I saw you go where none but brave men dare to go; saw you make three successful charges, preserving your line as well as if on dress-parade....
Page 39 - ... charged the third time; but, when I saw your ranks withering and your comrades falling, it made my heart grow sad within me, and I ordered you to fall back. You know the rest. You were surrounded, and there was no escape. But I miss your noble commander, Col. Ely : may he soon return to you ! Boy.% to your valor I owe my safety. You come from a State whose soldiers never disgrace themselves nor their flag. I am proud of you, and ever shall be of such soldiers.
Page 64 - We are 7o miles from our base of supplies, which must be brought to us in wagons under a strong guard. Cavalry must do that duty. Reported that they have much trouble from the guerrillas under Mosby and others.
Page 39 - Rebel infantry, and charged up to their batteries ; driving away their gunners, still pressing on, and breaking their reserves. But a third line was too strong for you. I knew it was. Only then did you fall back, when your lines were broken, and many brave Connecticut men lay bleeding on the field. But you only fell back to reform, and give them another taste of your steel. I knew it was madness to order you forward again ; it was ordering you to death and annihilation ; for I well knew you would...
Page 161 - Our soldier life had come to an end. No more picket and guard duty. No more marching by day and night in all kinds of weather. No more camp life, sleeping on the ground in all kinds of weather. No more the long roll to call us out in the night.
Page 17 - In conversation with the natives we would try and keep them talking, on account of their peculiar dialect. We never could find out how far it was to the next town, in miles. The answer would be
Page 19 - I saw a scout coming, almost flying, down the pike. Jumped his horse over a stone fence that surrounded our camp. Headed straight for the Colonel's tent. Without any ceremony rushed in, informed the Colonel the enemy was almost upon us.

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