Cold War's Last Battlefield, The: Reagan, the Soviets, and Central America

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SUNY Press, Dec 1, 2011 - History - 349 pages
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Central America was the final place where U.S. and Soviet proxy forces faced off against one another in armed conflict. In The Cold War’s Last Battlefield, Edward A. Lynch blends his own first-hand experiences as a member of the Reagan Central America policy team with interviews of policy makers and exhaustive study of primary source materials, including once-secret government documents, in order to recount these largely forgotten events and how they fit within Reagan’s broader foreign policy goals. Lynch’s compelling narrative reveals a president who was willing to risk both influence and image to aggressively confront Soviet expansion in the region. He also demonstrates how the internal debates between competing sides of the Reagan administration were really an argument about the basic thrust of U.S. foreign policy, and that they anticipated, to a remarkable degree, policy discussions following the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
 

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Contents

1 What Reagan Faced
1
Wars Over US Foreign Policy
25
The Final Offensive 1981
47
4 Making Enemies in Nicaragua19791982
73
5 The Wars Escalate 19821983
97
6 The End of the Brezhnev Doctrine 1983
123
7 Muddying and Mining the Waters 19841985
151
8 The War at Home19811986
181
9 The IranContra Scandal19861987
211
10 Another Year Another Peace Plan1987
239
11 Endgame
263
12 Reagans Legacy
285
Central America and the War on Terror
305
Index
319
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About the author (2011)

Edward A. Lynch is Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Political Science Department at Hollins University. He is the author of Starting Over: A Political Biography of George Allen; Latin America's Christian Democratic Parties: A Political Economy; and Religion and Politics in Latin America: Liberation Theology and Christian Democracy.

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