The Colombian Civil War

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McFarland, Sep 15, 2001 - Social Science - 279 pages
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In 2000, the National Police of Colombia reported that 25,660 people met violent deaths in that country. According to the office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia, 170 civilians were killed in the first 18 days of 2001 in massacres and selective homicides related to that country's terrible civil war. By drawing on diverse sources of information, this work brings together the thoughts of historians, journalists, human rights activists, social scientists, military veterans, law enforcement officials, Congressional investigators, financial analysts, lawyers, Roman Catholic priests, peace organization spokespersons and others about the volatile present-day situation in Colombia. It explains the complexities of the drug-financed civil war and details Washington's concern that the Colombian conflict will destabilize the Andean region. Photographs and maps enhance the text.
 

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Contents

Two They Fought Like Lions
18
Three The Genesis of Violence
38
Four The Mistake from Hell
61
Five The Next Vietnam
77
Six Guerrillas at the Door
99
Seven The War on Drugs
134
Eight Death Squads
162
Nine Northern Brothers
188
Ten The Peacemaker
226
Afterword
257
Bibliography
263
Index
267
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About the author (2001)

Bert Ruiz is a former Wall Street executive and is current chairman of the Colombian American Association. In 1997, President Ernesto Samper presented Ruiz with the Republic of Colombia's prestigious award, "La Orden Nacional al Merito." He lives in Pleasantville, New York.

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