The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast

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U of Minnesota Press, 2008 - Social Science - 346 pages
Literary critics frequently portray early Native American writers either as individuals caught between two worlds or as subjects who, even as they defied the colonial world, struggled to exist within it. In striking counterpoint to these analyses, Lisa Brooks demonstrates the ways in which Native leadersa including Samson Occom, Joseph Brant, Hendrick Aupaumut, and William Apessa adopted writing as a tool to reclaim rights and land in the Native networks of what is now the northeastern United States.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
xi
A Note on the Maps
xvi
A Map to the Common Pot
xix
Entering Native Space
1
Samson Occom the Mohegan Land Case and the Writing of Communal Remembrance
51
Competing Visions of the Common Pot
106
William Apess and the Mashpee Woodland Revolt
163
5 Envisioning New England as Native Space
198
Mapping the Genres of Indigenous Writing in the Network of Relations
219
Literacy and the Oral Tradition
246
Notes
255
Index
321
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Lisa Brooks (Abenaki) is assistant professor of history and literature and of folklore and mythology at Harvard University.

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