The Company Town: Architecture and Society in the Early Industrial Age

Front Cover
John Garner
Oxford University Press, Oct 1, 1992 - Architecture - 256 pages
Built by industrialists whose early businesses contributed to the escalation of the Industrial Revolution, company towns flourished in countries that embraced capitalism and open-market trading. In many instances, the company town came to symbolize the wrecking of the environment, especially in places associated with extractive industries such as mining and lumber milling. Some resident industrialists, however, took a genuine interest in the welfare of their work forces, and in a number of instances hired architects to provide a model environment. Overtaken by time, these towns were either abandoned or caught up in suburban growth. The most thorough-going and only international assessment of the company town, this collection of essays by specialists and authorities of each region offers a balanced account of architectural and social history and provides a better understanding of the architectural and urban experiences of the early industrial age.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
COMPANY TOWNS IN EUROPE AND SCANDINAVIA
15
COMPANY TOWNS IN NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA
109

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information