The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics, and Morals, of the Late Dr. Benjamin Franklin, Now First Collected and Arranged: With Memories of His Early Life, Volume 2

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Page 441 - If war should arise between the two contracting parties, the merchants of either country, then residing in the other, shall be allowed to remain nine months to collect their debts and settle their affairs, and may depart freely, carrying off all their effects, without molestation or hindrance...
Page 441 - ... in their persons, nor shall their houses or goods be burnt or otherwise destroyed, nor their fields wasted by the armed force...
Page 378 - Nature a Thief, and compare the whole Amount with the Wages of a Manufacturer of Iron or Wool in England, you will see that Labour is much cheaper there than it ever can .be by Negroes here.
Page 403 - Finally, there seems to be but three ways for a nation to acquire wealth. The first is by war, as the .Romans did, in plundering their conquered neighbours ; this is robbery. The second by commerce, which is generally cheating. The third by agriculture, the only honest way...
Page 428 - Fishermen, for the same reason. 3. Merchants and traders in unarmed ships, who accommodate different nations by communicating and exchanging the necessaries and conveniences of life. 4. Artists and mechanics, inhabiting and working in open towns.
Page 418 - ... us; for it was the first thing that put our girls upon knitting worsted mittens for sale at Philadelphia, that they might have wherewithal to buy caps and ribbons there ; and you know that that industry has continued, and is likely to continue and increase to a much greater value, and answer better purposes.
Page 201 - ... the egg, and endeavouring, by the action of your hands and feet against the water, to get forward, till within reach of it. In this attempt you will find that the water buoys you up against your inclination ; that it is not so easy to sink as you imagine, and that you cannot, but by active force, get down to the egg.
Page 128 - I hope this will give some check to the rage of destroying trees that grow near houses, which has accompanied our late improvements in gardening, from an opinion of their being unwholesome. I am certain, from long observation, that there is nothing unhealthy in the air of woods; for we Americans have everywhere our country habitations in the midst of woods, and no people on earth enjoy better health, or are more prolific.
Page 146 - At length being at Clapham, where there is, on the common, a large pond, which I observed one day to be very rough with the wind, I fetched out a cruet of oil, and dropped a little of it on the water. I saw it spread itself with surprising swiftness upon the surface; but the effect of smoothing the waves was not produced; for I had applied it first on the leeward side of the pond, where the waves were largest, and the wind drove my oil back upon the shore. I...
Page 412 - For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth of the ox that treadeth out the corn.

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