The Condition and Fate of England ...

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J.& H.G. Langley, 1843 - England
 

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Page 71 - But though glory be gone, and though hope fade away, Thy name, loved Erin ! shall live in his songs, Not even in the hour when his heart is most gay Will he lose the remembrance of thee and thy wrongs ! The stranger shall hear thy lament on his plains ; The sigh of thy harp shall be sent o'er the deep, Till thy masters themselves, as they rivet thy chains, Shall pause at the song of their captive and weep ! WHILE GAZING ON THE MOON'S LIGHT.
Page 92 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 290 - Islands — the frenzy of believing, or making believe, that the adults of the nineteenth century can be led like children, or driven like barbarians ! This it is that has conjured up the strange sights at which we now stand aghast ! And shall we persist in the fatal error of...
Page 277 - How have ye treated us; how have ye taught us, fed us and led us, while we toiled for you ? The answer can be read in flames, over the nightly summer-sky.
Page 92 - ... after, insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves ; and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue there withal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast...
Page 272 - To us individually this matter appears, and has for many years appeared, to be the most ominous of all practical matters whatever; a matter in regard to which if something be not done, something will do itself one day, and in a fashion that will please nobody.
Page 290 - Exchequer ; whence do they spring, and how come they to haunt our shores ? What power engendered those uncouth shapes, what multiplied the monstrous births till they people the land ? Trust me, the same power which called into frightful existence, and armed with resistless force, the Irish volunteers of 1782 — the same power which rent in twain your empire, and raised up thirteen republics — the same power which created the Catholic Association, and gave it Ireland for a portion.
Page 73 - An air of romance and chivalry is around her. The traditionary tales that live in her literature invest her history with heroic beauty. But she has no need of these. Real heroes — the O'Neills, the O'Briens, and the Emmets, will be remembered as long as self-denying patriotism and unconquerable valor are honored among men. In every department of literature she still takes her place. Where is the wreath her shamrock does not adorn ? Where the muse that has not visited her hills...

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